Sunday Morning Promenade — Part 2

This Sunday morning’s stroll around the garden with the camera yielded many nice surprises. I wanted to document the views in walking order. I began the tour with Sunday Morning Promenade — Part 1. Picking up the wander at the northwest corner, here are more glimpses.

This Anemone coronaria is one of those surprises. I expected this to be ‘Admiral’ which I planted last fall. It appears to be  ‘Governor’ from a spring planting the previous spring.

Anemone coronaria ‘Governor’

Anemone coronaria ‘Governor’

Walking up toward the house along the Northern border, in front there is ‘May Night’ which came into bloom this week, and Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox) and Nepeta ‘Walker’s Low’ (Catmint) which seem very close to opening.

Meadow Sage ‘May Night’

Meadow Sage ‘May Night’

Meadow Sage ‘May Night’ With Dianthus barbatus ‘Barbarini  Mix’ (Dwarf Sweet William)

Meadow Sage ‘May Night’ With Dianthus barbatus ‘Barbarini Mix’ (Dwarf Sweet William)

Meadow Sage ‘May Night’ With Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox)

Meadow Sage ‘May Night’ With Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox)

Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox)

Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox)

Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox)

Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox)

Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox)

Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox)

This Northern border is where the bulk of the irises are.

Northern Border Looking West

Northern Border Looking West

In the area toward the northeastern corner of the garden (just out of view in the photo above) many irises are quickly are filling out and showing color. ‘Raspberry Blush’ is usually an early bloomer and is one of the few irises I actually bought. Most are pass-alongs.  After dividing these irises last summer I was concerned I’d lost track of Iris ‘Batik’ but it showed up in its original location. Paeonia ‘Pink Parfait’ (Peony) has more buds than ever before.

Iris germanica 'Raspberry Blush'

Iris germanica ‘Raspberry Blush’

Iris germanica 'Raspberry Blush'

Iris germanica ‘Raspberry Blush’

Iris germanica 'Raspberry Blush'

Iris germanica ‘Raspberry Blush’

Iris germanica 'Raspberry Blush'

Iris germanica ‘Raspberry Blush’

Iris germanica 'Raspberry Blush'

Iris germanica ‘Raspberry Blush’

Iris germanica 'Raspberry Blush'

Iris germanica ‘Raspberry Blush’

Iris germanica 'Immortality'

Iris germanica ‘Immortality’

Iris germanica ‘Batik’ (Bearded iris)

Iris germanica ‘Batik’ (Bearded iris)

Paeonia 'Pink Parfait' (Peony)

Paeonia ‘Pink Parfait’ (Peony)

Paeonia 'Pink Parfait' (Peony)

Paeonia ‘Pink Parfait’ (Peony)

Before leaving the Northern border I stood at the peony and turned around to look back across the meditation circle towards the southwest corner. The garden was calm and pleasing this morning.

Meditation Circle

Meditation Circle

Turning back around to face the Northern border and continuing eastward I noticed ground covers at Northeastern corner are filling in between the entrance stones at gate.

Sedum and Isotoma fluviatilis (Blue Star Creeper) at North Gate

Sedum and Isotoma fluviatilis (Blue Star Creeper) at North Gate

The Eastern border is that area along the foundation of the house. There is a large swath which I recently showed filled with Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine) and Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm).

Facing the central back stairs leading down to the patio is a small planting of Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft) and Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (Beardtongue).

Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft) and Penstemon digitalis 'Husker Red' (Beardtongue)

On the other side of the stairs, in the back are two Hydrangea macrophylla (not shown) with green leaves, but the buds appear to have been damaged once again, this year by a severe freeze earlier in the month. In front of the hydrangeas is a Gaura that needs to be moved. It starts out promising each spring but does not bloom well. Further down are the Shasta daisies from the start of the tour.

Gaura lindheimeri 'Passionate Blush' (Butterfly Gaura)

Gaura lindheimeri ‘Passionate Blush’ (Butterfly Gaura)

Leucanthemum x superbum (Shasta Daisy), Yarrow and Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

Leucanthemum x superbum (Shasta Daisy), Yarrow and Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

Finally, I stepped through the South gate into the Southern Side Garden. Clematis ‘Jackmanii’ is beginning to glow. The yellow bearded iris along the path is usually one of the first to bloom. It seems late this year. Baptisia ‘Purple Smoke’ is sending up shoots. A pretty multi-stemmed white Narcissus is blooming. This may be from the home where I grew up or from a purchase last year. I wish I had not lost track of this one.

Clematis 'Jackmanii'

Clematis ‘Jackmanii’

Clematis 'Jackmanii'

Clematis ‘Jackmanii’

Iberis Sempervirens (Candytuft) and Viola

Planter of Iberis Sempervirens (Candytuft) and Viola below the Clematis ‘Jackmanii’

Iris germanica (bearded German Iris)

Iris germanica (bearded German Iris)

Baptisia 'Purple Smoke'

Baptisia ‘Purple Smoke’

Narcissus (Daffodil)

Narcissus (Daffodil)

End of tour. Thanks for coming along.

18 thoughts on “Sunday Morning Promenade — Part 2

  1. Christina

    Your garden is suddenly far ahead of mine; I only have one bearded iris flowering while most of yours are blooming or are about to bloom. The walk around the garden was a lovely idea for a post, I may have to copy you if you don’t mind.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Christina, it seems like things are rushing along too quickly now. This is the best season for my garden so hope it doesn’t go too fast. I’m sure your irises will decide to open soon. I was worried the post was too long and my navigational explanation too confusing, so I appreciate that you stuck with it. I’d love to see your garden walk as well.

      Reply
  2. Cathy

    Thank you for the tour Susie – I really enjoyed it! That Raspberry Blush iris is gorgeous. Fabulous photos of it too. I like the way the foliage of the Phlox and Shasta daisies makes the garden look so lush. You are quite a bit ahead of us now, but things can happen so quickly here if we get a spot of rain. I would love to go on the same tour in a month or so and see how everything has developed. In fact it is such an inspired idea I might have to copy you and try something similar myself! 🙂

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I would enjoy seeing your garden tour as well Cathy. I found myself tripping over how to explain where I was so glad it made some sense. I love that Raspberry Blush. We’ve had a lot of rain recently. Hope there will be some left for summer here and hope you get “a spot” soon.

      Reply
  3. mattb325

    The tour was a lovely idea. And, your garden is looking just superb. As for that Raspberry Blush Iris. Wow! Isn’t that just the loveliest, softest colour?!!!!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Glad you enjoyed touring my spring garden Matt. Raspberry Blush is an unexpected color in my garden. The iris blooms early and adds punch to that corner.

      Reply
  4. Alberto

    And thank you for taking me along this tour! I love that phlox divaricata, can’t wait to see it all in bloom. i also like the pink iris a lot because it’s not a baby pink, the beard is orange and gives a rather sexy tinge to flower.
    Just a note: are you sure that clematis is ‘jackmanii’? Because that clematis is a viticella from group 3 and it’s supposed to bloom much later in the season, like in mid summer, because it flowers on the new stems. The one you show here seems to have bigger flowers and to be part of group 2 if already in bloom. Anyway it looks great.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Alberto, I do think this is jackmani, but I’ll have to look back at my records. Last year I pruned it back hard in late winter, but this year it was already starting to bud by the time I had a chance to get to it, so it got only a light trim. ‘Raspberry Blush’ is much pinker in other photos I’ve seen. This one is more peachy/apricot and I like it better for having that orange beard too. Thanks for touring the garden.

      Reply
  5. Donna@Gardens Eye View

    I cannot get over how much is growing…your garden looks like my late spring garden…and I am smitten with Iris germanica ‘Raspberry Blush’…I have wanted a pinky peach iris and have not had luck finding one…I will look for this and see if I can find it.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      The garden has really taken off Donna. Hope it doesn’t rush through too fast. I found ‘Raspberry Blush’ at a local garden center, but when I looked it up just now online most images show the flower looking more pink/purple than this one. Mine has a decidedly peach/apricot tinge.

      Reply
  6. P&B

    Wow! Your garden is very lush and colorful now. Winter has finally released her grip over there. We still have more cold temperatures to deal with.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.