A Wander Through A Riparian Urban Garden

 

Wyatt Visitors Pavilion Entrance - Cape Fear Botanical Garden

Wyatt Visitors Pavilion Entrance – Cape Fear Botanical Garden

On Easter weekend my husband and  travelled 70 miles south to Fayetteville, North Carolina, to visit two of my sisters. One sister volunteers at Cape Fear Botanical Garden and after a delicious lunch, she and I managed to escape for a couple of hours to tour the garden. It was my first time seeing it, though I had wanted to for a long time.

The tulips were beautiful the day we were there. A cheerful planting greeted us at the entrance to the visitors center. Once we had our tickets we emerged out the back of the center we immediately encountered more tulips. My sister is at the garden weekly and for some time had been admiring this lovely group.

Tulips

Tulips

Tulips

Tulips

Also just outside the visitor center door I had to stop to enjoy two copper-toned planters, on either side of the path, each holding a Japanese maple.

Planter behind Wyatt Visitors Pavilion

Planter behind Wyatt Visitors Pavilion

 

Planter behind Wyatt Visitors Pavilion - Looking toward Cypress pond

Planter behind Wyatt Visitors Pavilion – Looking toward Cypress pond

The brick path between the two planters (in the lower right above) led through an arbor where I was soon captivated by this little unfamiliar daffodil known as Narcissus ‘Hawera’ (Hawera Daffodil).

Narcissus 'Hawera' (Hawera Daffodil)

Narcissus ‘Hawera’ (Hawera Daffodil)

Fayetteville has an annual dogwood festival that was coming up and the dogwoods we saw this day were further along in bloom than mine back home. Dogwoods are understory plants that love the forest’s edge. They thrive under these loblolly pines.

Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood)

Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood)

The varied terrain of this 80-acre garden allows visitors to enjoy an open pine forest (quite typical of this region) that soon gives way to sandy paths and nature trails leading through hardwood forests and eventually sloping down to meet the Cape Fear River.

Preserved natural areas are home to indigenous plants and wildlife while the cultivated areas feature 2,000 varieties of ornamental plants.

The garden has extensive and well-known collections of daylilies, hostas and camellias. Actually it was the camellias I had especially wanted to see.

Due to a combination of illness and wintry weather I had missed attending the 69th Fayetteville Camellia Festival hosted in this garden a few weeks earlier. Luckily a good number of camellias were still in bloom at Easter, including this pale pink Camellia japonica ‘Magnoliaeflora.’

Camellia japonica ‘Magnoliaeflora’  1886

Camellia japonica ‘Magnoliaeflora’ 1886

In close proximity to the Camellia Garden sits the Children’s Garden featuring this oversized chair with a seat cushion of Clematis armandii (Evergreen Clematis).

Oversized chair in Lilliput Labyrinth Garden

Oversized chair in Lilliput Labyrinth Garden

Working our way back from the Camellia Garden we paused to admire a redbud along side the Cypress Pond and check out the frog fishing off the pier.

Redbud in bloom at Cypress pond

Redbud in bloom at Cypress pond

Eventually we came to a picturesque gazebo with red maples in the background.

Butler Gazebo - Cape Fear Botanical Garden

Butler Gazebo – Cape Fear Botanical Garden

Further along the path there were azaleas, rhododendron, viburnum and this attractive plant brightening the fence. Unfortunately I could not find a label for this one.

Bluff Garden and Cross Creek Overlook

Bluff Garden and Cross Creek Overlook

Bluff Garden and Cross Creek Overlook-2 Bluff Garden and Cross Creek Overlook

We did not have time to see the entirety of this botanical garden on that afternoon so we did not actually make it all the way down to the Cape Fear River. But this section is referred to as Bluff Garden and Cross Creek Overlook. It was quite restful and peaceful as we sat watching this view of Cross Creek and listening to the birds.

Bluff Garden and Cross Creek Overlook

Bluff Garden and Cross Creek Overlook

With time running out we retreated back toward the visitors center. First though we had one more stop to make.

Historic Eastern Carolina Farmhouse

Historic Eastern Carolina Farmhouse

The McCauley Heritage Garden features a furnished historic eastern Carolina farmhouse that was built in Eastover, Cumberland County in 1886 by Alexander Carter.  The house was relocated to CFBG on February 3, 1996. It really is a quintessential style house common to this area.

It is here that my sister hangs out when volunteering each week, guiding visitors through the farmhouse. Unfortunately no one was working the day we visited so I had to peek inside the window to catch a glimpse of the interior.

Historic Eastern Carolina Farmhouse

Historic Eastern Carolina Farmhouse

Historic Eastern Carolina Farmhouse

Historic Eastern Carolina Farmhouse

Interior - Historic Eastern Carolina Farmhouse

Interior – Historic Eastern Carolina Farmhouse

Also on display along with the farmhouse is a typical tobacco barn and a general store that was once operated by the Carter family.

Tobacco Barn

Tobacco Barn

General Store

General Store

General Store

General Store

In front of the farmhouse was an extensive kitchen garden with roses, nepeta and herbs. Raised beds in another portion of the heritage garden are used for growing flowers and vegetables, part of a gardening therapy program for war veterans returning to nearby Ft. Bragg.

McCauley Heritage Garden

McCauley Heritage Garden

The sandy path leading us back to the visitors center was lined with a beautiful forsythia hedge, much of which had already finished blooming for this year.

Sandy Path Along Forsythia Hedge

Sandy Path Along Forsythia Hedge

As we returned to the visitors center there were yet more tulips to admire. This was my favorite.

Tulips

Tulips

I really enjoyed finally getting to see the Cape Fear Botanical Garden first-hand. My sister made a wonderful guide and it was great to spend time with her. When we returned my other sister had managed to clean up the dinner dishes, package up several days worth of leftovers for us to take home, and she also had coffee and dessert waiting for us, a decadent chocolate pound cake. Good food, lovely garden, and loving sisters. It was a nice day.

18 thoughts on “A Wander Through A Riparian Urban Garden

  1. Cathy

    Perfect! I should love to visit a garden like that – with my sister! Your photos are wonderful Susie. I am very impressed by those maples in the copper containers, and the setting of the gardens looks very natural. In fact it looked peaceful with few visitors, so you were lucky that day!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Sisters are great companions aren’t they? I enjoyed seeing this garden. You’re right, not many visitors that day, but there was a big wedding about to take place in the big pavilion. Apparently the garden is a favorite spot for weddings.

      Reply
      1. johnvic8

        I must admit it is one I HAD in my Chapel Hill garden. The one I planted here got root rot and I have yet to replace it. It is still my favorite.

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Oh thanks very much for the ID on the plant. I’m not sure–the petals didn’t seem very thick or waxy like a magnolia. That would be a native though.

      Reply
  2. Julie

    Susie, what a really happy post. The garden your sister volunteers in looks wonderful and very uplifting. How lovely to share your love of gardening with her. I occasionally visit different gardens with my mum who is a passionate gardener, its always a happy day for us too.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Julie, it was a happy day. So nice you and your mother can enjoy garden visits together too! It’s hard to be unhappy in a garden.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I loved seeing the garden with my sister. There were lots of families enjoying the garden that day and even a wedding was about to get underway while we were there.

      Reply

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