In A Vase On Monday—Azure Medley

In A Vase On Monday - March Medley

Monday brings an opportunity to practice flower arranging by joining in Cathy’s weekly  In A Vase On Monday, where the only rule is to fill a vase using materials gathered from one’s garden.

In A Vase On Monday - Pseudomuscari azureum (syn. Muscari azureum)

In A Vase On Monday – Pseudomuscari azureum (syn. Muscari azureum)

I was excited about cutting a few Azure Muscari this morning to use for my Monday vase. They have just opened in the last couple days. Though there only are 6 growing in my garden, they are so diminutive it seemed worthwhile to cut a few to enjoy close-up.

Pseudomuscari azureum (syn. Muscari azureum), the azure grape hyacinth features a bright blue color with a darker blue stripe on each flower. The flowers themselves grow on densely-packed racemes.

In the Pseudomuscari genus the mouth of the flowers is shaped like an open bell, rather than narrowing the way it does on Muscari.

Each flower forms an open bell - Pseudomuscari azureum (syn. Muscari azureum)

Each blue flower forms an open bell – Pseudomuscari azureum (syn. Muscari azureum)

I recently bought 2 round black pin holders, very tiny, just 3/4 inch, so decided to try one out today. It was more difficult to use than expected so I will need to practice more with it. It is hard to get small stems inserted securely without damaging them. Very cute holder though.

3:4 inch Black Pin Holder

3:4 inch Black Pin Holder

For the container I needed something flat and chose the white inside of a lid from a small round box of English bone china. The white side of the lid is visible in the very first image (the official portrait of today’s design). Later I turned the lid over and forgot to turn it back. I was experimenting after noticing the colors of the outside of the box lid might complement the flowers. Of course the top side provides no way to hold water anyway.

In A Vase On Monday

In A Vase On Monday

Companions for this week’s Azure Muscari are Spiraea prunifolia (bridal wreath spiraea) and Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft), both just coming into bloom, along with rich purple Viola that bounced back admirably from a cold winter in the meditation circle.

Spiraea prunifolia (bridal wreath spiraea)

Spiraea prunifolia (bridal wreath spiraea)

Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)

Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)

Viola

Viola

A scattering of Iberis leaves help balance the design.

In A Vase On Monday

In A Vase On Monday

Many thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting. Please visit her to see what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday.

38 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday—Azure Medley

  1. Christina

    I am intrigued by how you use the pins to create such elegant designs; I must try again to buy some. The lid of the box really picked up on the colour of the viola.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      The pins are fun to use Christina, though they don’t work for everything. I needed a small one for an upcoming class on Small Design (8×8 inches or 20.32 c). Hope you can find some locally. I had to order this one and it cost very little, but the shipping charge was horrendous.

      Reply
      1. woodlandgnome

        Muscari remain one of my favorite early flowers. I have them everywhere, especially in pots, but we are still waiting for them here 😉 Their color is so intense- and highlights so many other flowers. Best wishes, WG

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Marian. I enjoyed seeing the photographers’ setup along the hike you took. I would have commented but lost my courage half-way through your post. My phobia kicked in big time.

      Reply
  2. Donna@Gardens Eye View

    I have 2 pins but none so small….I am also intrigued how you used them….and you featured viola….love it with another favorite the muscari which is an unusual one, Azure Muscari. A bit of a cross between a muscari and a Puschkinia. A beautiful simple display with wonderful color and lines Susie!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I appreciate that John. My arrangements never turn out the way I first imagine them, but they’re always fun to do. And it’s so nice to have fresh flowers in the house.

      Reply
  3. Cathy

    That’s a gorgeous muscari, and what an elegant little offering you have given us, yet again! using the lid upside down was an inspired choice, although it looked good in the photo shoot the other way up too, with those beautiful colours! Thanks for sharing, lovely as always 🙂

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Cathy. Most of my photos ended up with that lid turned the wrong way so I felt I had to explain why. Oh, well. It’s so nice to have a bit of choice as to what to display on Monday.

      Reply
  4. gardeninacity

    That is truly an elegant and beautiful grape hyacinth. But are all Muscari now Pseudomuscari? Or just some? It sounds kind of insulting, like they are poseurs and not genuine.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Jason, isn’t it nice? Far be it from me to explain anything about how flowers are named, but from what I understand this is actually a different genus from the Muscari genus (although they are related). The tip about the bell-shaped mouth is apparently a distinguishing feature.

      Reply
  5. Kris P

    I was surprised when I realized how small the arrangement actually was, Susie – it has a presence that reads big in photos. I love the color of the Pseudomuscari and I covet the Spirea.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Wish I could send you Spirea, Kris. It’s sending out new shoots all around that I’m having to trim back. Tricks of the camera. The flowers were so tiny themselves but I tried to use them as I would larger ones. It would probably be helpful to use an object to help explain the size.

      Reply
  6. Cathy

    The selection of flowers is lovely Susie, and your arrangement is so calming and delicate and so carefully presented – beautiful photos. The first one with the white base and background and the scattered leaves is my favourite, but the colours on the lid do go so nicely with the viola too.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Cathy, I so appreciate your nice comments. Those first spring flowers are especially fun to work with–they need little adornment. I like the base turned to the white side also. Very often it’s after photographing the arrangement I can see what works and what doesn’t, but don’t usually have time to made adjustments.

      Reply
  7. Monica

    Very nice arrangement. The simplicity of the design showcases each flower very well. Good use of the pin frog too. I have a few and never ever use them –however I am not as good at the Ikebana style of floral arrangement as you seem to be.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Monica. Ikebana was on my mind after attending an Ikebana demonstration at Art in Bloom at NC Mus. of Art last week. The designer created 12 amazing arrangements in under 1.5 hours, so I was inspired to try something. She made it look easy, but…

      Reply
  8. rickii

    Creative thinking, using the upside-down lid. Too bad those pesky flowers demand water, as the colors of the lid reflect those of the flowers beautifully. My pin frogs mostly sit unused for the reasons you note. I’m hoping to get the hang of them with practice. This post is urging me on with your stunning results.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Hi Rickii. Yes, pull out those frogs and give them another try. The larger sizes (2 or 3 inches) are nice to work with, but this little one didn’t have very sharp points. Tricky.

      Reply
  9. Anna

    Oh the markings on the Pseudomuscari azureum are quite exquisite Susie. I clicked for a closer look. Do they self-seed and if so are they easy to keep under control? A most elegant arrangement.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Anna. The little Pseudomuscari are in their second year, and so far haven’t self-seeded at all. I would welcome a few more. susie

      Reply
  10. Amy

    Those pseudomuscari azureum are just lovely – they look betwixt and between a regular grape hyacinth and a puschkinia. Your whole combination is delightful, and I do like the idea of using the lid – it was certainly “thinking outside the box” 🙂

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Hi Amy, I chose the lid on a whim, so glad it worked out. The pseudomuscari are holding up well indoors where they’re much easier to enjoy at eye-level.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thank you. That dark-blue, stripy marking on the flowers is a bonus. These were a lucky, inexpensive purchase a couple of years ago. Hope the bulbs spread.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Linda. The spirea flowered for a very short time this year and is all leaves now. The viola is a self-seeded one from a batch a couple of years ago.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s