Rainy Wednesday Meditation Garden

Rainy Wednesday In Meditation Garden

Rainy Wednesday In Meditation Garden

Rainy Wednesday In Meditation Garden

Rainy Wednesday In Meditation Garden

I recently planted snapdragons on the outer left portion of the circle, violas on the right. The various thymes bloomed all summer. The chimes were bothering a neighbor so I had to take them down for now.

19 thoughts on “Rainy Wednesday Meditation Garden

  1. Julie

    Seems a shame that your wind chimes are down Susie, they must have been an unusually loud sort of chime, how about some cork to soften the noise. On the upside, your mediation circle must be lovely to walk on though with Thymes under foot.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks for the tip about using cork with the chimes Julie. The chimes are strong and nicely resonant and they add such a nice character to the experience of walking the meditation circle. I’ll still be able to move them around during the daytime. The thymes are not a fragrant as I’d expected but still are nice.

      Reply
  2. Pauline

    You have reminded me to bring my chimes in for the winter. They usually stay out for the summer when the wind is more gentle, but in the winter we do get some stiff gales!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Judy. I’m trying to use plants with a narrow form, but I’m still experimenting. The Husker’s Red penstemon requires a little trimming and some of those became to overgrown this year. It seeds so heavily I had plenty of replacements to use to fill in. I’ve also enjoyed using Angelonia for its strong color, blooming all summer, but it definitely needed pruning away from the stones.

      Reply
  3. Chloris

    For something fragrant underfoot for your meditation circle have you come across the lawn chamomile: Chamaemelum nobile ‘ Treneague’? It is non- flowering and dwarf but deliciously scented when trodden on.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      No, I hadn’t heard of ‘Treneague’ before but just looked it up and saw some very glamorous uses of it. Thanks for mentioning it Liz. I think I will give it a try.

      Reply
  4. Cathy

    It looks so green and peaceful. I have a thyme plant that smells very intense but is, I think, inedible as the tiny leaves are very hard and leathery.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I’d like to have a strongly scented thyme even if not edible, but then that seems a shame not to be able to use it. I now have three different ones now planted in the circle, but guess I haven’t selected them very well.

      Reply
  5. Christina

    It is sad that you’re had to take your chimes down; sound is another pleasure when out in the garden and chimes are rarely jarring. I’m really surprised that your thymes aren’t more scented. there are so many different varieties I’m sure you could find some others to try that would be perfumed and grow in the way you need. Chloris’ idea of camomile is a good one, although it can take a while to establish and you have to grow from plants as it doesn’t seed.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I was in a gardening funk this year so didn’t actively seek out a solution for the thymes or anything else much, but now with your encouragement and Chloris’s I will follow up and seek some different thymes and the chamomile. I like the decent of lemon thyme but it dies out after a while.

      Reply
  6. bittster

    I hope you show plenty of photos of the snapdragons, they grow much better down there with your milder winters (hopefully!) as well as the pansies.
    Creeping thyme is something I never had much luck with, it always would rot out…. but it’s a plant I love the look of. I hope you do find the chamomile, it sounds interesting.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Sure, I’ll try to show photos. I’ve never grown snapdragons this time of year but read they’ll flower until frost then remain green during winter. Should bloom again in early spring. These were planted rather late. Picked them up on sale for a quarter each, but they seem healthy. My experience is similar to yours with the thyme–part of it is always turning black, ruining the overall effect.

      Reply

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