First Morningtide—October 2014

Lantana camara (Common lantana) In Southern Border

Lantana camara (Common lantana) In Southern Border

Today’s early sky wore a draping, heavy fog. Dewdrops coated every leaf, flower and blade of grass. Would you agree the first morning hours are the the best time in the garden?

The lawn was covered with dozens of spiderwebs courtesy (I think) of Agelenopsis sp. (Grass Spider).

Agelenopsis sp. (Grass Spider)

Agelenopsis sp. (Grass Spider)

Agelenopsis sp. (Grass Spider)

Agelenopsis sp. (Grass Spider)

Agelenopsis sp. (Grass Spider)

Agelenopsis sp. (Grass Spider)

In the Southern Border everlasting sweet pea flowers continue to form.

Lathyrus latifolius (Perennial Sweet Pea)

Lathyrus latifolius (Perennial Sweet Pea)

Lathyrus latifolius (Perennial Sweet Pea) seems cheerfully content.

Lathyrus latifolius (Perennial Sweet Pea) seems cheerfully content.

Salvia greggii ‘Furman’s Red’ (Autumn Sage)  is new this year and has seemed slow to get growing. On the other hand, long established Salvia uliginosa ‘Blue Sky’ (Bog sage) is very aggressive.

Salvia greggii ‘Furman’s Red’ (Autumn Sage)  and Salvia uliginosa 'Blue Sky' (Bog sage)

Salvia greggii ‘Furman’s Red’ (Autumn Sage) and Salvia uliginosa ‘Blue Sky’ (Bog sage)

Salvia greggii ‘Furman’s Red’ (Autumn Sage)

Salvia greggii ‘Furman’s Red’ (Autumn Sage)

An interesting and delicate-looking fungus popped up today. I could not figure out its name, but a friend who has been studying all things fungi identified it as Parasola plicatilis.

Parasola plicatilis

Parasola plicatilis

Tradescantia used to be one of my favorite passalong plants, admired for its pretty blue, three-petaled flower. It became roguish in my current garden so I am always trying to dig it out or at least cut it back to keep it from flowering.  It is much tougher and persistent than I am though. Tradescantia is growing all around the garden, but this happens to be in the northwest corner of the Western Border.

Tradescantia (Spiderwort)

Tradescantia (Spiderwort)

I actually bought this white Tradescantia. Although white ones are found wild, this may be a hybrid. It does not have the tendency to wander.

Tradescantia (Spiderwort)

Tradescantia (Spiderwort)

The dogwood leaves picked up some autumn color this week. A bird (presumably) found and chewed one of these red ripened berries. Next year’s new buds are forming.

Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood)

Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood)

Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood)

Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood)

Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood)

Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood)

Hylotelephium telephium ‘Herbstfreude’ (Autumn Joy) has performed extremely well this year. Now its color is evolving through brick red and rusty hues. Notice the Salvia uliginosa ‘Blue Sky’ shows up frequently around the garden.

Salvia uliginosa 'Blue Sky' (Bog sage) and Hylotelephium telephium 'Herbstfreude' (Autumn Joy)

Salvia uliginosa ‘Blue Sky’ (Bog sage) and Hylotelephium telephium ‘Herbstfreude’ (Autumn Joy)

Hylotelephium telephium 'Herbstfreude' (Autumn Joy)

Hylotelephium telephium ‘Herbstfreude’ (Autumn Joy)

Roses need more care than is included in my normal “water twice and leave it alone” gardening philosophy. Rosa ‘Iceberg’ did poorly in the spring and I began thinking about taking it out of the garden altogether. This morning I found this excuse to delay.

Rosa 'Iceberg'

Rosa ‘Iceberg’

New lupine leaves look very healthy.

Lupinus ‘Woodfield Hybrids’ (Lupine)

Lupinus ‘Woodfield Hybrids’ (Lupine)

Lupinus ‘Woodfield Hybrids’ (Lupine)

Lupinus ‘Woodfield Hybrids’ (Lupine)

Though I have never seen one growing around here, I have always wanted to grow a lupine. It comes from long ago because of reading a book about The Lupine Lady to our young daughter. On a whim back in April I purchased a container of Lupinus ‘Woodfield Hybrids’  from a local nursery and for some reason (probably because the tag said it would be 5-6 feet tall) I put it toward the back of the Western Border where it was pretty much out of view. It did have several flowers but never gained its expected height.

May 15, 2014  Lupinus ‘Woodfield Hybrids’ (Lupine)

May 15, 2014
Lupinus ‘Woodfield Hybrids’ (Lupine)

If anyone can offer lupine advice I would appreciate your ideas. Did I end up with a dwarf variety or is this normal in the first season? Should I relocate it to the front of the border?

This photograph does not capture the foggy feeling but here is a view of the early morning garden.

Garden View With Fog In The Distant Sky

Garden View With Fog In The Distant Sky

22 thoughts on “First Morningtide—October 2014

  1. johnvic8

    I had so much trouble with “traveling” tradescantia in my Chapel Hill garden that I ruled it out of this one. Seedling showed up everywhere. Perhaps diligent deadheading before it sets seed may reduce the spreading. Your garden is lovely in the fog.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks John. For years I had tradescantia in my heavy clay soil in another Chapel Hill garden and it barely held on, but in my current garden the soil was heavily amended and beds are raised so this once-loved plant is a real nuisance now.

      Reply
  2. Cathy

    The mist makes for atmospheric photos – same here, and I walked into a very large and damp cobweb when out with my dog in the garden this morning! The fresh lupin leaves are very pretty and would look fantastic in a flower arrangement… 😉

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      You’re right Cathy. Those lupines leaves might show up in a vase very soon! By the way today I toured a well-know nursery about an hour away and what did I see staring back at me? Centranthus ruber ‘Coccineus’ (Red Jupiter’s Beard Valerian). Of course I had to get it so I’ll have to find it a good home tomorrow.

      Reply
  3. Judy @ newenglandgardenandthread

    You captured some gorgeous shots. I love spider webs – they are so amazing. We humans work on all our arts and crafts and those little guys can create such intricate pieces. 🙂 No suggestions on Lupines from me – mine did well for several years but the wicked winter last year took them out.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Judy. You’re right–spider webs are fascinating and there are so many different types. I’ll try to give the lupine a nice layer of mulch to protect it this winter.

      Reply
  4. gardeninacity

    The spiderwebs are wonderful! Though perhaps you don’t think so. I envy your flowering dogwood. I tried growing it but it is just not hardy here. Everyone plants Kousa dogwoods, but it’s not the same at all.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Actually I do like to study spiderwebs–so amazing. Landscapers like to push Kousa dogwoods but I am more fond of the native flowering dogwood. At my former house we lived among lots of them and now I have too much sun for them to do really well.

      Reply
  5. Chloris

    Hylotelphium? Oh dear, when did that happen? When did they stop being sedums? I can’ t keep up with it. I am busy at the moment trying to remember Symphiotrichum.
    I love those spiders’ webs, how beautifully intricate.
    Lovely photos.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Liz. I was content to call this sedum or stonecrop, but Hylotelephium telephium just showed up on a plant label for these about 2-3 years ago and I thought I better get with the times. I just saw the term Symphiotrichum this week but had already forgotten it. Quiz me in another week!

      Reply
  6. Annette

    Autumn is definitely in the air! Lovely pictures, Susie, I’m also intrigued by all the spider’s webs…they’re such a busy folk! Spotted your bird bath – it’s very pretty. I also looked up the mocking bird – I think we may have it in Europe as well.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Annette. That ceramic bird bath was a gift from my sisters several years ago. Mockingbirds are everywhere around here and easily recognizable because there songs changes so often. As mimics they have been known to work in man-made, modern noises into their repertoires, such as car beeps and cell phones.

      Reply
  7. bittster

    The lupine leaves look wonderful. It’s one of my favorites although I never have much luck growing them. Actually I’m a little jealous since my best excuse has been it’s just too hot here…. I guess I need to re-examine that one since yours looks quite successful!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I wish I could share some of its strength and endurance for your garden Malc. Salvia uliginosa is a plant you helped me identify a couple of years ago. Before that I’d only known it as Blue Sky salvia.

      Reply
  8. Christina

    Yes, autumn is here. The early mornings are cool, I need slippers to walk on our tiles floors and the trees are losing their leaves, so far no misty mornings but there is dew every day. Tradescantia is difficult to grow in some garden but is happy in yours; it had lovely blue flowers why not enjoy it and only keep it under control in some areas.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Hope you’re enjoying your autumn. The cooler weather has been invigorating. Tradescantia has become a serious problem and I’m trying to stay on top of it. I still love the little flowers though and a few sneak through. It is reseeding like mad.

      Reply
  9. Donna@GardensEyeView

    The garden is looking lovely…we had some foggy days too. The lupines like sun and they should get taller…they can be temperamental though. They don’t like amended soil generally so normal to clay soil is good in sun with good moisture in the first few years. Let them go seed and spread the seed to ensure they keep growing and flowering.

    Reply

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