In A Vase On Monday—Blue Mist With Vermilion

In A Vase On Monday – Blue Mist With Vermilion

Each Monday brings an opportunity to join in Cathy’s weekly challenge called In A Vase On Monday. The goal is to fill a vase using materials collected from the garden.

Early this morning I gathered a variety of plants to create a formal arrangement, but time seems to be evaporating today, so I will save that idea for another time. Instead I am sharing a loosely arranged design that practically assembled itself when I was placing the flowers in water for conditioning.

The main focal flowers are sprigs of blue, fuzzy-headed Conoclinium coelestinum and stems of vermilion-hued Chrysanthemum. Off to one side sits a scarlet Dahlia ‘Blue Bell’ flower in a small pewter vase. The strong colors seem appropriate for early autumn.

Conoclinium coelestrium (Blue Mist Flower) and Chrysanthemum

Conoclinium coelestrium (Blue Mist Flower) and Chrysanthemum

Conoclinium coelestinum, also known as Blue Mistflower or Hardy Ageratum, is native to eastern United States and attracts butterflies to the garden. It has been blooming for several weeks and should continue well into fall. The Blue Mistflower and the Chrysanthemum come back reliably every year without any attention.

A couple of leaves from Brunnera macrophylla ‘Silver Heart’  add a heart-shaped foliage accent. Several stems of Perovskia atriplicifolia extend loosely outward, repeating the color of the Blue Mistflower. A slender, flowering stalk of Heuchera villosa ‘Big Top Bronze’ (Coral Bells) added a vertical element to the vase.

In A Vase On Monday

In A Vase On Monday

Both containers used in today’s arrangement are special treasures received many years ago. The little pewter vase was a bridesmaid’s gift from a college friend and is engraved with the date of her wedding. The footed, cut glass vase originally held a sunshiny bouquet of daffodils, a spring token from another friend. The vases are extremely versatile and I have reached for them over and over again to hold small to medium-sized flowers.

Materials
Conoclinium coelestinum (Blue Mistflower, Hardy Ageratum)
Dahlia ‘Blue Bell’
Chrysanthemum sp.
Brunnera macrophylla ‘Silver Heart’ (False Forget-Me-Not)
Perovskia atriplicifolia (Russian Sage)
Heuchera villosa ‘Big Top Bronze’ (Coral Bells)

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting. Discover what delightful things she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday.

30 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday—Blue Mist With Vermilion

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Glad you like this combination Donna–I like the colors together too. The vase did come together easily, which is good because I was short on time, but I see some changes I’d make if there had been more analysis up front.

      Reply
  1. Christina

    What a lovely coloured ‘mum’, I thought it was a Dahlia when I first say it. Do you find the Perovskia tends to shed its flowers rather quickly once cut? A definite autumn feel to your vase this week, Susie.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I’m fond of the mum Christina. Although this year I bought a couple of yellow ones to insert among my shrubs in the front yard for a bit of fall color, I usually prefer the darker, wine colored ones. Perovskia doesn’t last well for me either. I’d forgotten that point when I cut a few stems this morning.

      Reply
  2. Cathy

    A lovely colour combination and I do like those fluffy blue flowers. Using brunnera foliage is an excellent idea. Mine are just sending up new leaves. You have a good eye for shaping your arrangements too. 🙂

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Cathy. There is an annual called Ageratum that looks like this blue mist flower. Until today I’d thought they were the same. My brunnera is new this year and I’m happy it survived.

      Reply
  3. Cathy

    That’s an interesting brunnera leaf – not as silvery as the Jack Frost I have. It softens the green and pulls the other colours together, doesn’t it? This chrysanthemum is a pretty little flower, and although you imply that the vase more or less made itself it looks perfectly balanced and fluid it shows you have a natural touch – it looks so effective and as always we can learn from your skills. Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Cathy, that Brunnera is called ‘Silver Heart’ and the outer leaves are nice and silvery. I reached inside for some newer leaves because the others looked a bit worse for the wear. I’ll have to pay attention to see when the foliage takes on a more silvered hue. Thanks for your nice comments.

      Reply
  4. Elizabeth

    Hi Susie, this is such a beautiful arrangement … if only I had the same talent for arranging flowers … and I do like the striking colour combination. The deep red of the chrysanthemums is stunning – they make a wonderful contrast with the fluffy blue conoclinium coelestinum, another new-to-me plant … I am discovering so many new plants by following Cathy’s meme.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Elizabeth. That blue conoclinium coelestinum was a passalong from my mother’s cousin oh so many years ago. Sometimes I think I’ll dig it all out but then it blooms and I love it again.

      Reply
  5. Mominthegarden

    Hi Susie, that arrangement is simply beautiful! I love the colours. I especially love the blue, fuzzy-headed Conoclinium coelestinum! I have never seen that plant before and I think it is gorgeous. How nice to see all the different arrangements from Cathy’s meme! Dana

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Dana. The blue mist flower was a passalong plant I’ve had many years. It’s not particularly attractive most of the year but to have a blue blooming like that in autumn makes me like it more.

      Reply
  6. sweetbay

    Such a pretty bouquet! Your dahlia looks to be blooming a lot. I think I have a grand total of two dahlia blossoms at this time.

    You’ve reminded me to add that Brunnera to my garden. Those leaves are very striking.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thank you! The dahlia has had about 4 blooms so far but it is covered in buds. Seems late to me. Yes, do add Brunnera. Mine is new to my garden this year and I’ve been very pleased. It looked nice all summer.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks. This is the first time I remember using blue mist flower indoors and it’s holding up pretty well. Usually I start yanking it up when I see it but invariably some gets left behind and for a few weeks this time of year I gain renewed appreciation for it.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks, That Chrysanthemum lives off neglect and barely noticeable in an out-of-the-way place in the garden, but its red flowers always bring a smile when I stumble across them.

      Reply
  7. Kris P

    The Ageratum is the perfect element to offset the deep color of the Dahlia, Susie. I’d hoped I’d have Ageratum to use in a vase one day but they’ve performed very poorly for me this year.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Sorry about you Ageratum Kris. The leaves looked terrible on mine all summer but it bloomed fine. It held up well in the vase so hope you get some next year.

      Reply

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