In A Vase On Monday—Crape Myrtle Lineup

Lagerstroemia (Crape Myrtle) Lineup

Lagerstroemia (Crape Myrtle) Lineup

On Mondays it is fun to practice flower arranging by joining in Cathy’s weekly challenge In A Vase On Monday. The goal is to fill a vase using materials gathered in one’s own garden.

My plan this week was for a simple vase. The two Lagerstroemia (Crape Myrtle) at the end of the front walkway had begun blooming last week. I thought I could quickly snip an inflorescence early this morning and drop it the new blue ceramic vase my sisters gave me this spring.

But once outside I saw that four branches of the tree, weighted down by the heavy flowers, were overhanging the sidewalk. This ruined my plan for quick simplicity, because I trimmed those branches back and ended up bringing lots more flowers into the house than I needed.

Lagerstroemia (Crape Myrtle)-5

I began implementing my original idea for today’s arrangement and soon decided the shape and color of the beautiful vase I had chosen did not complement the form of this Crape Myrtle with its pinky-pinky tone.

The condition of the flowers was not as fresh as I had expected—petals were already fading and seed pods were forming. Also I was surprised by how much yellow was visible in the flowers and found it distracting. Lagerstroemia (Crape Myrtle)-4

 

More interesting to me were the component parts of the Crape Myrtle and I began dissecting the flower heads and stems. I filled a variety of containers, one with the berries, one with leaves, others with combinations.

Lagerstroemia (Crape Myrtle) Berries

Lagerstroemia (Crape Myrtle) Berries

Lagerstroemia (Crape Myrtle) Component Parts

Lagerstroemia (Crape Myrtle) Component Parts

In the end I made a more formal design as well which turned out to be my favorite individual  arrangement.

Formal Design Using Lagerstroemia (Crape Myrtle)

Formal Design Using Lagerstroemia (Crape Myrtle)

My quick idea for today’s vase turned into a more detailed and interesting study of the characteristics of the Crape Myrtle. A collection of vases is something I think works well under many circumstances, using a combination of materials or, as in this case, just one plant.

Materials

Lagerstroemia (Crape Myrtle)
3 Flower pins
Variety of vases

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting. Discover what she and others are placing In A Vase On Monday.

29 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday—Crape Myrtle Lineup

  1. Christina

    It is fun to have a collection of vases; I like the collection as well as the more formal arrangement. I do enjoy your style of arrangements very much. Again your Lagerstoemia is far in advance of mine, which I hope will produce a few more flowers this year.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks so much Christina. I have a long counter separating the kitchen and the living area that is perfect for lining up vases of flowers, but it’s hard to get a good photograph there. I often use the concept of grouping vases when entertaining to divert guests’ eyes away from the last minute pots and pans that end up in the sink. It’s sort of the equivalent of planting something outside to hide a utility pole or something like that. Hope you get lots of flowers this year on your Lagerstroemia. I feel mine is a little bit early this year but we have already had temperatures usually reserved for August. Susie

      Reply
  2. SmallHouseBigGarden

    I fell in love with crape myrtles the first minute i saw them when i moved to Fl. Such a pretty, full bloom!
    Your vase arrangements are really pretty; I’m glad you DIDN’T keep it simple! 🙂

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      When crape myrtles bloom it certainly feels like summer around here. I’m finding it hard to stick to one idea with these Monday vases–one thing leads to another.

      Reply
  3. bittster

    What an interesting story for such a simple task. It sure did take on a life of its own! I like what you ended up with and it’s quite the study in crape myrtle. That’s one plant I wouldn’t mind growing up here… if only it could without too much trouble.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      The moral of this post is that it’s hard to keep things simple! Crape myrtles are ubiquitous in this area and you can get them in a range of sizes.

      Reply
  4. Cathy

    Oh what a good idea, even though it wasn’t what you planned! I love the idea of disassembling your pickings like this (this is the sort of thing primary school children have to to do for design and technology these days – not just making but disassembling first!). I am in awe of the whole impromptu concept, Susie, and even though I admire the last display I like the grouping even more. Isn’t it wonderful the journey this meme takes us on?! 🙂 Thanks so much your all the inspiration you have contributed over the last few months.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Hi Cathy, my vases never turn out quite as planned. It is indeed a journey and we’re lucky. It is so interesting to do the exploring. Susie

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Kristin. Nice that you made the connection with your tree in Dallas. Although I brought along many plants when I moved here, I still miss some plants I left behind at my former garden. Susie

      Reply
  5. Chloris

    Beautiful, the same plant, but you have made them all look so different. The last one does inded look very Japanese. I love it. You never see this lovely plant here, is it hardy?

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Hi Chloris, Wikipedia says crape myrtle is hardy south of USDA zone 6 (from −23.3 °C (−10 °F) to −20.6 °C (−5 °F)). This came from China originally but there are lots of hybrids now, one for every situation.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.