In A Vase On Monday—Drifts Of Color

Camellia x 'Coral Delight and Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Camellia x ‘Coral Delight and Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

Cathy’s In A Vase On Monday challenge encourages gardeners to create floral designs from materials gathered in our own gardens each week.

Today my display features Camellia x ‘Coral Delight’. This shrub has been full of rich, promising buds this year, but since early March, just as the flowers begin opening they are marred by unfriendly cold or rain, even ice. But I found a few blooms in good enough condition yesterday to share them.

Camellia x 'Coral Delight and Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)-4

Planted nearby the camellia, Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose) remain unfazed by winter’s tricks. Since there were not many camellias untouched by the weather, I decided the Helleborus might pair well as floating companions to the camellias, despite almost jarring color contrasts.

Camellia x 'Coral Delight and Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)-6

No floral mechanics or special techniques were required in constructing today’s design.

I gently cut the stems very short and dropped the blossoms into an Italian glass dish filled with fresh, cool water. Growing up, many a special meal would be served at my house alongside colorful camellia blooms in clear glass bowls. Hellebores were a much later discovery.

Camellia x 'Coral Delight and Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)

The slightest movement against the glass causes the flowers to rearrange themselves. I like the free floating results as the blossoms shift and drift.

Camellia x 'Coral Delight and Helleborus x hybridus (Lenten rose)-3

Thanks again to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting. Visit her site to see her arrangement this week and see what other participants are placing In A Vase On Monday

23 thoughts on “In A Vase On Monday—Drifts Of Color

  1. Christina

    Nice idea to float the Camelias, it is such a shame that they flower just when they are prone to cold winds and frost; the climate they come from must be very different. My post is up now too!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Camellias are so commonplace around here one would think they’re native, but of course they are not. I’ve had this one ten years and it’s the first time it’s been so damaged by the winter. I don’t see your post but will look for it later. Susie

      Reply
  2. Chloris

    I love this way of displaying Camellias and Hellebores. It is perfect for a table arrangement. It looks so pretty. That is such a pretty Camellia, what a pity that most of the blooms have been ruined by the weather. We are having the same trouble with Magnolias here, just as they are looking their best we have had a frost.

    Reply
  3. Julie

    Beautiful, I have just been introduced to floating Hellebores, the Camellias are very pretty displayed like this. How lovely to associate special meals with a flower too.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Julie. In particular I remember the sasanqua camellia floating in a little dish at our Thanksgiving dinner. My mother’s cousin (my gardening mentor) always brought several beautiful red blossoms.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thank you Jayme. Bet you have some lovely camellias. (The sweetbox you gave last year took a hit from the cold but it still is living. No sign of the aconite yet, but the hydrangeas are very promising. I do appreciate them all.)

      Reply
  4. Cathy

    That is an intriguing colour of camellia, Susie, and interesting to read how commonplace they are near you. What a good idea to add hellebores to your dish too – they are a similar shape and the colour contrasts rather than jars, whilst the movement must add another dimension. When I floated my hellebores they were packed in quite tightly so I didn’t get that effect and must try it out. Isn’t it fun trying different things each week?

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Yes, I’m enjoying the challenge to use my flowers each week and it is fun to see what everyone else puts together as well. Lots of fun. Susie

      Reply
  5. Julie

    It is lovely to see your camellia flowers and hellebores floating together Susie – I am going to try this when the next camellia flowers. The ones that came into flower a couple of weeks ago have now finished, but I have 2 more bushes with big fat buds – I am just hoping the hard frosts are not causing damage to the unopened petals. Do you ever add floating candles to your bowls of flowers?

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Julie, I’ll look forward to seeing your camellia when they come into bloom. I want to add some more to my garden. I hadn’t thought of using candles but thanks for the suggestion. That would be a nice addition. Susie

      Reply
  6. Cathy

    Those colours are so striking together – I think nature can never clash! I like the idea of floating camellia flowers in a bowl too. The overall effect is like a painting. 😀

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Cathy, I think you’re right–nature can be bold with colors and they seem to work. Thought you might joint in again today-your violets were so pretty last week. Nudge, nudge. 🙂 Susie

      Reply
      1. Cathy

        Maybe next week Susie – it seemed such a shame to cut anything from the garden yesterday, and the ground was pretty wet for walking on anyway!

  7. garden98110

    Very cool and early Summer looking. These flowers have donated themselves to a grand vision. It is not so easy to catch the light, shadow and architecture of the different species of flower with the effect of floating above water. The pastel colors in the glass are a great effect. Thanks.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I’m delighted you picked up on the different aspects of this arrangement. Photographing flowers is a challenging process for me. The images reflect the arrangement but never seem to capture it completely.

      Reply
  8. Annette

    Looks just delicious, Susie, and I think Chaenomeles would do the job too. They have so many more flowers and it wouldn’t hurt to cut some – thanks for the inspiration!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Annette. I wasn’t familiar with this name but when I looked it up I do know it–as flowering quince–so glad to learn the genus name. Chaenomeles would probably be lovely floated in this manner. Would love to see it if you give it a try.

      Reply

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