Icy Morning

Garden Under Ice

Sleet yesterday and overnight left the garden highlighted in white.

The sun has cleared most of this away now but we will not see our temperature reach near 60°F as is normal here for early March. Instead it is just barely above freezing, 33°F at 1:00pm. It certainly is much warmer than in many parts of the U.S., still though it will be colder than usual for this entire week.

The two trees at the center back against the fence I imagined were Italian Cypress, but I have concluded they may be Spartan Juniper. I do not know if the left one is salvageable after this rough winter. The pair had grown too close together anyway, already outpacing their estimated width.

Winter is hanging on a bit, but last Sunday was warm, over 70°F, and I think the grass is getting greener. Daffodils are ready with fat buds, waiting for a few nice days.

Garden Under Ice-Meditation Circle

21 thoughts on “Icy Morning

  1. P&B

    Every time there is a forecast for a snow storm in your area, I wonder how your garden is holding up. I’m glad that it’s not too affected and is ready for spring. Hope the Daffodils won’t get freeze burn.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      That is so kind of you. Thank you! I’m sure most things will be ok but am worried about a couple of gardenias. Hope you are managing ok. You must be anxious for some warm weather too. Susie

      Reply
  2. Cathy

    The circle is looking really pretty – the snow/ice defines the lines so nicely. I think you’re right about the trees being Juniper as they resemble ones we ruthlessly chopped down when we moved here. It was a massive tangle of mostly horizontal growth and dead branches and covered the whole of the west-facing rockery!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      The snow didn’t last but did give me some ideas about redrawing some of the borders. It was effective in helping me see some things. Thanks for the ID of the Junipers. I hate to lose another one, mainly because I’d rather concentrate on flowers.

      Reply
  3. Christina

    The days it is cold for you we have rain (lots yesterday) but today is cold and sunny but will warm up I hope. Keep snug and warm Susie and just enjoy the garden through the windows.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Are you glad for the rain Christina? We’ve had a wet winter. More freezing rain tomorrow then springlike temperatures for the weekend. I was hoping to get to a hellebore farm open house but the weather may put an end to that.

      Reply
      1. Christina

        It has been a very wet winter, but as it doesn’t rain for 2 or 3 months in summer I always feel that it should rain in winter, at least the well shouldn’t run dry.

  4. Pauline

    I hope your icy weather warms up soon, it can’t be good for the plants to be stop, start, all the time. When your daffodils open, you will feel that spring has arrived. Keep warm!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Pauline. It will be nice to finally have the daffodils. They’re still waiting and a good thing as more freezing rain is on the way. Then a warm weekend.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks. The icy whiteness defines the edges of the labyrinth in an interesting way. I like the peaceful look of it under snow or ice. All disappeared now.

      Reply
  5. Annette

    Frost without a protective snow cover is always worrying. How are your hellebores and camellia coping? Fingers crossed for warmer weather – here we’re in the middle of spring already!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      The hellebores look fine but the buds on the camellia japonica that should open soon look brown. Glad you’re enjoying your spring Annette already. It must feel good to be outside in the garden.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks–I’m so discouraged about possibly losing more trees. Had to replace a huge one last year. I want to have a mixed hedge border for privacy and screening, but am almost ready to throw in the towel on it.

      Reply
      1. garden98110

        It is discouraging to lose parts and pieces of our garden design, especially the important pieces making it an enclosed space, which is a garden! I have scrolled back and as best I can guess, suspect you have arborvitae, a kind of false cedar. Juniper is usually snow hardier than arborvitae. Juniper is one of the longest living species on earth. And while It adds an extra step in building a permanent mixed hedge-screen, stand alone trellises in your preferred style at critical points can provide support for quick screening, non invasive roses, clematis, even grapes while replacement specimens of your choice are growing in. — THGg

      2. pbmgarden Post author

        Thanks for the suggested ID. I have an arborvitae but don’t think this particular tree is one. Would love to have trellises as you suggest and have considered them before. These decisions are complicated but will have to work on this again. Thanks.

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