Leaves of Grass and Daffodils

The snow ended two days ago and yesterday was blue-sky sunny and 60 degrees F.  The snow is melting on the roads and sidewalks, but hangs on in the grass and gardens. This morning it has been raining and the day is colder, 41°F.

For weeks, daffodils have been emerging in many spots around the garden and last week I saw one in the neighborhood in full bloom.  Now after this snow the daffodil leaves appear to be boldly rising.

Emerging Daffodils

Emerging Daffodils

Snowy View On Rainy Morning

Snowy View On Rainy Morning

To frozen clods ever the spring’s invisible law returns,
With grass and flowers and summer fruits and corn.

from: Continuities. BOOK XXXIV. SANDS AT SEVENTY. Leaves of Grass, by Walt Whitman. Project Gutenberg-tm

24 thoughts on “Leaves of Grass and Daffodils

  1. Judy @ GrandparentsPlus2

    I’m thrilled someone is seeing progress because we still have several feet of snow, covered with an icy crust with more snow coming this afternoon and Tuesday. Geez – it is going to be a while for us so I’ll enjoy your gardening progress. 🙂

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I imagine it will take a while for that snow to disappear, but I know you’l have some great projects to keep you busy indoors a while longer. I am getting anxious to get out into the soil.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Healing Garden gardener! I had intended to plant more things in the small circle last fall, but here it is February and the circle kept going without my intervention.

      Reply
  2. gardeninacity

    What an invigorating sight! We still have plenty of snow here, but I did just notice a sign of spring – the goldfinches seem to be changing to their bright yellow warm season clothes!

    Reply
  3. bittster

    So it sounds as if you’re ready to tackle the garden again? Funny how a break sounds nice in the fall, but then come springtime you’re anxious to get out there again. Hope the thaw works out for you! It’s nice to see spring plants forging their way through the last (I hope) bits of winter.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Winter break from the garden has been nice, but I am definitely ready to get going again! Everything is pretty wet and there is still a lot of snow, despite the warm temperatures this weekend. Soon though.

      Reply
  4. Christina

    The definition of the stones within the meditation circle are interesting as the snow melts more quickly over the stones. The daffodils will be most cheery when they bloom.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      The snow boosted my interest in the garden. Now I’m ready to get out in the soil, but have to wait for it to dry out a bit. Still patches of snow.

      Reply
  5. Green Chimneys Garden

    Did you put the mediation circle in? I am interested in putting a similar type of walking labyrinth in our school garden and am just beginning to look for installation advice. Trying to consider weeds, aesthetic appeal, possible recycling of materials, etc. Any words of wisdom?

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Yes, I made the meditation circle. I wanted to grow plants in-between the paths–wish I had allowed more space between the paths for that. (It’s hard to find narrow plants that work.) I wish I’d solved the drainage problems better before placing the stones (Perhaps raising it up would have been the key.) For a school setting you might need to consider if the path should be separate stones or a smoother surface for easier walking or accessibility. Best of luck. Please let me know how it turns out.

      Reply
      1. garden98110

        The Meditation Circle and Labyrinth is an outstanding feature of your garden. Here in the Healing Garden, we are especially grateful for the snaps you share throughout the seasons. This way, your Meditation Circle continues being meditative far from home!

        Here, we are fond of four season paths for public gardens of compacted crushed rocks on a porous raised bed. Of course, it is in keeping with a traditional Japanese style of constructing paths to inset flat “stepping” stones in the center of the path. They must be flush and narrow enough to pass between the wheels of a chair. Paths can be edged with yarrow and Anthemis nobiliis (lawn chamomile), both of which are used in golf course lawns because of their toughness. The flower are wonderful, and fragrance is nice, too, when tread on. THGg

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