Frosty Brr-illiance

Daphne odora (Winter daphne)

Daphne odora (Winter daphne)

The sun returned yesterday afternoon after days of rain and gloom. This morning the garden glistened through a frosty coating.

Buxus microphylla var koreana 'Wintergreen' (Wintergreen boxwood)

Buxus microphylla var koreana ‘Wintergreen’ (Wintergreen boxwood)

Echinacea seed heads show varying signs of foraging from the birds.

Echinacea purpurea 'White Swan' (Coneflower)

Echinacea purpurea ‘White Swan’ (Coneflower)

Starkly outlined grass leaves form colorful shadows against the oak leaf’s form.

Frosted Oak Leaf

Frosted Oak Leaf

Lagerstroemia (Crape Myrtle) leaves in cinnamon and citrus hues and rich chocolate-colored seed pods appear to be dusted in sugar.

Lagerstroemia (Crape Myrtle)

Lagerstroemia (Crape Myrtle)

Lagerstroemia (Crape Myrtle)

Lagerstroemia (Crape Myrtle)

Lagerstroemia (Crape Myrtle)

Lagerstroemia (Crape Myrtle)

It is nice to have the sunshine back for a few days.

22 thoughts on “Frosty Brr-illiance

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks, glad you like it. I enjoy taking close-ups and especially find it interesting to examine them later. I find little spiders or weird colors or things I hadn’t noticed at first.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Well now I’m curious. You’ll have to post some pictures of yours. The American Goldfinches have eaten the seeds away from the cones on some of the seedheads. The one in the lower right corner is still intact.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I agree the frost does add interest. The crape myrtles we have came with the house and I do not know what kind, but are supposed to be a dwarf variety (still they grew 15+ feet).

      Reply
  1. garden98110

    Thank you for sharing these thoughtfully composed snaps. I was attracted by the daphne odora. On closer examination, beyond the inspiring play of light and shadow on the sparkling leaves, is the way the ice crystals form. And where they form on leaves and flowers. It is fascinating imagining a pattern to the formation of frost, protecting the daphne for millennium as an indicator species growing on the margins of soil and climate conditions. – The Healing Garden gardener

    Reply

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