Early Morning Views and Notes

After several chilly nights today will be much warmer, reaching a high of 70°F. The time changed on Sunday, clocks set back, making the evening darkness felt more intensely.

The extra hour of daylight was reassigned to morning (sunrise today was at 6:44). At quarter past seven the suns glow on distant treetops was visible from an upstairs window. Still, the meditation circle and indeed the entire garden waited in shadow for the sunlight to reach.

Meditation Circle Early Morning View

Meditation Circle Early Morning View

Scenes From The Back Steps

At the southwest corner, growing too close to the ‘Carolina Sapphire’ Arizona Cypress, is a Cercis canadensis L. (Eastern Redbud) sporting golden color.

Early Morning View

Early Morning View

The circle of soil in front of the bench is where we recently removed a small (but growing too large) Red Maple that was not in a good location. For now I will plant some daffodil bulbs and a spiral of pansies.

Meditation Circle Early Morning View

Meditation Circle Early Morning View

The Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood) in the northwest corner lost many of its leaves when rain and winds passed through Saturday. Its scarlet leaves have been exceptionally colorful this year and the rusty-hued flowers of Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ (Herbstfreude) (Stonecrop) further up in the border unexpectedly reinforced the strong red. I am trying to notice combinations like this to employ for greater impact.

Meditation Circle Early Morning View

Meditation Circle Early Morning View

The foliage of the Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (Beardtongue) along the meditation path also works well in echoing the dogwood’s color.

Meditation Circle Early Morning View

Meditation Circle Early Morning View

Meditation Circle Early Morning View

Meditation Circle Early Morning View

The neighbors’ Platanus occidentalis (American sycamore) has been unattractively brown all summer, due to a fungus, I think. Finally its brown hue seems more seasonal.

Meditation Circle Early Morning View

Meditation Circle Early Morning View

In the meditation circle itself the cream/pale yellow pansies stand out much more than the blue and purple ones, another effect to remember when planting here. Subconsciously I may have remembered the white Iberis Sempervirens (Candytuft) that bloomed effusively in the circle for a time.

Meditation Circle Early Morning View

Meditation Circle Early Morning View

24 thoughts on “Early Morning Views and Notes

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Cathy, several years ago when I set out to redesign my garden I wanted it to be a peaceful setting and it has become so–part garden and part state of mind.

      Reply
  1. bittster

    Looks nice! I hope the sycamore does better next year, I bet with all your rain earlier in the year it didn’t help the foliage. They grow to be huge trees, but the bark is so nice.
    Did I miss something? I thought there used to be a maple in front of where the bench is, or is it just a bare spot…
    Frank

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Frank! Yes the tree is missing. The Red Maple was always intended to be temporary because we knew it would be too large, eventually overwhelming the garden and house. Its roots were encroaching and we knew it was time. Wish we’d planted it in a more suitable spot originally, but on our tiny lot there isn’t one.

      Reply
      1. pbmgarden Post author

        I appreciate that vote of confidence. People cringe at the thought of removing a tree but I had many (dozens) come down on my former house years ago during an ice storm, so I don’t like them towering over the house. Susie

  2. Jason

    I love the meditation circle and the beds you have around it. I also have noticed that Penstemon Husker’s Red also has really nice fall color.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Jason. The meditation circle is an important feature in my garden. Husker’s Red reseeds freely too so I have been able to share it. Have a good day! Susie

      Reply
  3. Annette

    Well, we’re in for our winter break, like it or not. My Cercis canadensis is turning red and orange and very little yellow in autumn. What kind of soil do you have?

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Hi Annette. Cercis canadensis is native here and mine is an “ordinary” one passed-along from a friend. There are a lot of cultivars that have different coloration. In general our soil is heavy clay, but mine has been improved with compost over the years. Haven’t had it tested. Yes, winter is coming.

      Reply
  4. Gede Prama

    Amazing and Thank you for writing which is quite good and best wishes always, and greetings. Kindness blossoms in your heart.

    Reply

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