October Sunday Flowers and Insects

An old favorite pass-along plant, this Chrysanthemum has been part of my garden(s) for more years than I can remember. Found the first flowers just starting to open today, bringing sweet memories of the person who shared it with me. The flowers are small and grow from a woody stem.

Chysanthemum

A transplanted Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower) began blooming several weeks ago bringing a fresh greenery and fresh blooms to the fall garden and attracting insects.

Gracing its flower was (I think) a Silver-spotted Skipper (Epargyreus clarus).

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Soon a bee moved in to join the party.

Bee on Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Bee on Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

The bee and the butterfly shared this flower for only a second or two before the bee settled down on a nearby flower.

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

20 thoughts on “October Sunday Flowers and Insects

  1. P&B

    I see that the bumblebees still go out for pollen and nectar there. Most of them have gone into hibernation up here since we hardly have any flowers left. It’s nice to see that your garden is still colorful at this time.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Hope the bumblebees enjoy the next day or so. Last week was mild but it’s a bit cooler this week, 70s today, but 50s for a high and upper 30s for a low by the end of the week.

      Reply
  2. Pauline

    Plants that come from friends are extra special, arem’t they Susie. Your Echinacea is looking really good with it’s skipper, mine were over long ago, and I don’t think they are going to flower again.

    Reply
  3. Annette

    I’m not a great fan of Chrysanthemum but have fallen for a beautiful burgundy red one at the market last saturday. They’re just part of autumn and I like to mix them with grasses and pumpkins. Lovely moth on you pics, Suzie.

    Reply
  4. bittster

    I like those pass along chrysanthemums… actually mums in general are growing on me this year. Maybe it’s the season but I may have to search out a few new ones this spring 😉

    Reply
  5. Judy

    I ordered 3 coneflower plants(?) for next spring. I thought they were rather expensive ($25 approx. per plant). Always admired yours! Looking forward to trying them in our yard.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Judy, you must have chosen a very special hybrid. Check out Plants Delight Nursery online for comparison. I just have the regular ones. Hope you will enjoy growing them. Susie

      Reply
  6. Christina

    Plants that have come from special people always remain special. Your cone flowers are beautiful, mine are all just seed heads now by I am still enjoying their form.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      The cone flowers this late are a treat, but most of mine are also gone to seed. I’ve left them for the birds but don’t really notice birds enjoying them any longer. Am. goldfinches were attracted to them earlier.
      Susie

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Yes, even after last night’s frost the echinacea were still holding their own. The mum is a very hardy kind with a woody stem, but even the grocery store kind can last a few years outdoors here. Thanks for your comment Donna.

      Reply

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