Misty View From The Southern Side Garden

The Southern Side Garden hosts the plant of the moment—Hedychium coronarium (Ginger lily). The delicate flowers began blooming last week and have multiplied each day.

Hedychium coronarium (Ginger lily)

Hedychium coronarium (Ginger lily)

A light rain fell most of the day, but pulling into the driveway after an errand I spotted the enchanting plant near the entrance to the garden path and decided to ignore the misty shower long enough to get a picture or two.

Hedychium coronarium (Ginger lily)

Hedychium coronarium (Ginger lily)

Hedychium coronarium (Ginger lily)

Hedychium coronarium (Ginger lily)

Since spring this part of the garden has had little attention but a few reliable perennials and reseeding Cleome maintain interest.

Cleome hassleriana (Spider Flower)

Cleome hassleriana (Spider Flower)

Perovskia atriplicifolia (Russian Sage) is a plant I have enjoyed for years, but I have yet to find a good location for it in this garden. It is not particularly thriving here along the Southern Path, but it does provide a few interesting, colorful flowers.

Perovskia atriplicifolia (Russian Sage)

Perovskia atriplicifolia (Russian Sage)

Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’ has become a summer favorite and the drops of rain made its deep hues appear even richer. It blooms for a while, then takes a break. Perhaps the cooler weather agrees with it. Black and Blue overwinters here making it a very easy-care plant.

Salvia guaranitica 'Black and Blue'

Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’

Salvia guaranitica 'Black and Blue'

Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’

Near the entrance gate to the main garden Rudbeckia hirta ‘Irish Eyes’ towers above the fence. Blooming since July, this Rudbeckia has made its finest show ever this year.

Hedychium coronarium (Ginger lily)-2

Hedychium coronarium (Ginger lily), foreground.  Rudbeckia hirta ‘Irish Eyes,’ upper right background.

Rudbeckia hirta 'Irish Eyes'

Rudbeckia hirta ‘Irish Eyes’

Almanac

Temperatures remained unseasonably cool by 10-15 degrees. At 7:00 pm it is 70°F.

20 thoughts on “Misty View From The Southern Side Garden

  1. P&B

    Lovely Ginger Lily. Your garden must fill with their fragrance. I still have a vivid memory of how Ginger lily perfumes the air. I wish mine would bloom one of these years.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      P&B, the first couple of blossoms did have a strong scent but overall the fragrance has been less strong than I remember from previous years. I wonder if the rain is muting the effect. It’s supposed to dry out a little so I’ll test that theory this week. Hope yours will bloom for you!

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Charlie, a neighbor shared this plant with me 5 or 6 years ago. It’s not very common here as far as I know. In dry years it disappoints profoundly but it loves this rainy summer.

      Reply
  2. Cathy

    Do ginger lilies smell good? Some flowers look best in the rain I think, and this lily is perhaps one of them – the salvia definitely lends itself well to raindrops and it is a shame it probably isn’t hardy enough for my garden.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      The ginger lily has a sweet scent sort of like a gardenia, but the fragrance has been less pronounced this year (maybe the rain?). I’m fortunate so many plants overwinter here as I am not energetic about caring for them in the winter or growing seeds indoors. Have a great day!

      Reply
  3. Pauline

    Your ginger lily is gorgeous as is your Rudbeckia Irish Eyes. I bought one last year so at the moment it is quite small, hopefully next year it will have enough strength to grow to its full height. Love your salvia, we would have to take cuttings to overwinter that, it is so beautiful, it would be worth the effort!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Pauline. Hope you will enjoy your Irish Eyes. I moved a piece of mine several years ago to this particular location in the Southern Side Garden where it has more room. The original one is still too crowded but bloomed anyway.

      Reply
  4. Christina

    I always love that Salvia when you show it. I am often dissapointed with salvias here as they always need irrigation during the summer and I always think they shouldn’t need it. Perovskia on the other hand thrives in hot dry free draining soil, perhaps it is a little humid to perform at its best for you?

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Christina, this salvia does much better here with plenty of water, but I agree it seems it shouldn’t require so much. The Perovskia probably needs more free draining soil and also more room. It’s got competition in both locations where I’m trying to grow it. I always enjoy seeing yours “done right.”

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Judy, mine are pass-alongs from a neighbor but I don’t see them anywhere else around this area. In dry years they shrivel up and turn brown and disappoint, but it’s worth it to me to keep them. Years like this rainy one provide the reward.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Posting the almanac has been useful when I’m looking back through previous years. Our week-long cool spell is ending–August weather is back.

      Reply

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