Two Garden Mysteries

This summer I find myself with two plants I cannot identify so thought i would crowdsource the identification. I would appreciate your suggestions as to what these are.

Could It Be Hydrangea?

The first is, I think, a hydrangea that must have been planted and crowded out by a large Juniper tree years ago, before it could ever become part of my gardening memory.  I have attempted to grow hydrangeas many times with no success, though I see them thriving all throughout the neighborhood, the town and the Southeast. When the big Juniper died last year leaving a gaping hole in the corner landscape, it was subsequently replaced with a small version of its former self. Meanwhile, suddenly given space, light and rain this unknown plant, seeking the advantage, has grown large this summer. It is mostly leaves, the pale pink flowers are unimpressive. If this is hydrangea it has to be the most unassuming, understated one I have ever seen.

Hydrangea?

Hydrangea?

Hydrangea?

Hydrangea?

Hydrangea?

Hydrangea?

The last time I recorded buying Hydrangeas was April 2008 when I purchased a Hydrangea macrophylla ‘Sadie Ray’ and a Hydrangea serrata ‘Coerulea lace.’  No images I found of these two match my enigmatic plant.  Maybe it is not even a hydrangea? Any ideas?

The Second Puzzlement

This spring I mail-ordered a great number of perennials and very few survived. I can account for most of them but cannot match anything from that order with this plant. Because of its location in a new, part-shade border filled with caladium and coleus, I feel certain this plant is from that spring order.

The long pointed leaves are smooth. Small, tightly-clustered flowers are tinged with pink before opening white.

Coleus and Mystery Plant

Coleus and Mystery Plant

Coleus and ??

Coleus and ??

Caladium, Coleus and ??

Caladium, Coleus and ??

I am curious. Any ideas as to what these plants might be?

18 thoughts on “Two Garden Mysteries

  1. Christina

    I think from the foliage that the first one must be a hydrangea but the second – I have no idea sorry; I’ll come back later to see if anyone out there knows!

    Reply
  2. bittster

    How about some good news and some bad news? Your first mystery looks as if it might be a callicarpa or beautyberry, it should develop bunches of purple/amethyst berries in the fall…. a cool color at that time of year. The second mystery is some sort of smartweed. I would even pull that one, although there are worse weeds out there!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Ah ha, I looked them up and I see what you mean. Thank you so much! I’ve seen callicarpa in the neighborhood. Don’t think I’ve ever actually planted it. The smartweed outsmarted me. Susie

      Reply
  3. Cathy

    It seems they have been identified already… I wouldn’t have been able to help anyway! Hydrangeas don’t grow for me either. Maybe too dry, as they need a lot of water.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      A local blogger gave me a hydrangea this spring that has done ok so far. Yay! We’ve had so much rain this year I thought maybe one of my previous attempts at growing hydrangeas was coming back to life. Take care.

      Reply
  4. Pauline

    I see that they have been identified, that’s good because I wouldn’t have known what they are! The Callicarpa does have really gorgeous berries, I will look forward to the photos in the autumn

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Pauline. I hope to be able to share some good pictures of it this fall. Unfortunately the callicarpa is not located in a good spot for the long-term, so I’ll need to find it a better permanent place. Stay cool.

      Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks for confirming the Beauty-berry, John. Unfortunately it is going to be crowded eventually by the ‘Carolina Sapphire’ Arizona Cypress. I do look forward to seeing the berries in fall. Take care. Susie

      Reply

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