Flora at Duke Gardens

Visiting Duke Gardens last weekend I was struck by the complexity of foliage, but anyone who knows me would not be surprised that I was also enjoying the flowers.

The rose garden was punctuated with beautiful Oriental Lilies.

Oriental Lily

Oriental Lily

Next a cheerful group of summery yellow composites was enhanced by bring planted with Pineapple Lily at the beginning of the Perennial Allée.

Eucomis comosa 'Sparkling Burgundy' (Pineapple Lily)

Eucomis comosa ‘Sparkling Burgundy’ (Pineapple Lily)

Eucomis comosa 'Sparkling Burgundy' (Pineapple Lily)

Eucomis comosa ‘Sparkling Burgundy’ (Pineapple Lily)

Once inside the Terrace Gardens the view was vivid, yet serene. The dark foliage and red blooms of the Canna nicely offset the cool, sedate greens vying with multicolored flowers.

View at Duke Gardens

View at Duke Gardens

Taking the steps and rising above the canna I found the Rudbeckia hirta ‘Indian Summer’ to be quite winsome.

Rudbeckia hirta 'Indian Summer' - Black-Eyed Susan

Rudbeckia hirta ‘Indian Summer’ – Black-Eyed Susan

Richly hued annuals accented the Terrace Gardens where each level is organized with thoughtful  and exciting plant combinations. The Rudbeckia hirta ‘Cherokee Sunset’ were especially vibrant, so I studied what other materials were used in this area.

Rudbeckia hirta 'Cherokee Sunset'

Rudbeckia hirta ‘Cherokee Sunset’

In addition to Rudbeckia hirta ‘Cherokee Sunset’ the garden beds on this level featured:
Solenostemon scutellariodes ‘Pineapple’ – Pineapple Coleus
Solenostemon scutellariodes ‘Dipt in Wine’ – Dipt in Wine Coleus
Gomphrena ‘Qis Red’ – Globe Amaranth
Lantana Bandito Orange Sunrise – Lantana
Mecardonia ‘Magic Carpet Yellow’ – Baby Jump-Up
Manihot esculenta ‘Variegata’ – Variegated tapioca was also listed on the plant marker for this grouping but I could not recognize it.

Solenostemon scutellariodes 'Dipt in Wine' - Dipt in Wine Coleus, Rudbeckia hirta 'Cherokee Sunset'

Solenostemon scutellariodes ‘Dipt in Wine’ – Dipt in Wine Coleus, Rudbeckia hirta ‘Cherokee Sunset’

I like the effect achieved by mixing the Rudbeckia with the red Globe Amaranth and the dark wine coleus. The colors relate to the higher level as well.

Solenostemon scutellariodes 'Dipt in Wine' - Dipt in Wine Coleus, Gomphrena 'Qis Red' - Globe Amaranth, Rudbeckia hirta 'Cherokee Sunset'

Solenostemon scutellariodes ‘Dipt in Wine’ – Dipt in Wine Coleus, Gomphrena ‘Qis Red’ – Globe Amaranth, Rudbeckia hirta ‘Cherokee Sunset’

Rudbeckia hirta 'Cherokee Sunset'

Rudbeckia hirta ‘Cherokee Sunset’

The bright citrus yellow of Pineapple Coleus is a strong and attractive choice in this collection. I do not plant many annuals but would enjoy this color in my garden. I have a much larger Lantana with similar coloring that could use a good companion.

'Pineapple' - Pineapple Coleus, Lantana Bandito Orange Sunrise - Lantana

‘Pineapple’ – Pineapple Coleus, Lantana Bandito Orange Sunrise – Lantana

16 thoughts on “Flora at Duke Gardens

  1. Christina

    I have to admit that this isn’t my favourite kind of planting, however they have used some interesting combinations and some plants I don’t know at all. I especially like the small flowered red lantana?

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Christina, the lantana is the low-growing, orange plant in the lower right of the last picture. The small-flowered, red in the lower left of the previous two pictures is Gomphrena ‘Qis Red’ – Globe Amaranth. It dries very well.

      Reply
  2. Cathy

    I think any of those coleus would set off a Lantana well. Like Christina, this planting is not really my “style”, but I do tend to look at individual plants rather than an overall effect, so I would love to walk around practically ANY garden, this one included! I like the “Baby jump up”, which I don’t think I’ve seen before. I just read that it loves heat, so may be worth looking for as an annual for the rockery next year. Thanks for sharing again Susie!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Cathy, I tend to zero in on individual plants too–that ‘Cherokee Sunset’ drew me in to look at this section. ‘Baby jump up’ would look great in your rockery. I’d never heard of it either. I love visiting different gardens and it’s nice this one is close enough to enjoy it at different seasons. Thanks for visiting!

      Reply
  3. bittster

    I do like this kind of planting! Theresstill a little more soil showing than I would like, but I love the lushness and the colors. Also even though I bet this was all bedded out in the spring it doesn’t have that municipal bedding plant feel. Probably because plants are blended in together well and there is so much height variation.
    I like how they used the browns of the black eyed Susan. I’m never sure how to deal with that color… Sometimes I’m just anxious to rip it out and admit I can’t do it!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I’m never sure how to use color either so it was an interesting exercise to explore this one specific planting combination. The spring planting was gorgeous with tulips and anemones.

      Reply
  4. Pauline

    What a beautiful lily in your first photo, the perfume must have been wonderful. I do like the drift of Rudbeckia, such a cheerful colour! How lucky you are to have such a wonderful garden so close to you.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      I agree Donna, that coleus and rudbeckia is a strong combination. You’re lucky to have oriental lilies. They make such an impact. For a few years in this garden I’ve been afraid to tempt the deer. Susie

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.