Garden Bloggers Foliage Day – June 2013

Joining Christina at Creating my own garden of the Hesperides for Garden Bloggers Foliage Day (GBFD), today I am examining the impact of foliage in my June garden.

I like to use silver-foliaged plants and am pleased with the perennial Dusty Miller along the front of the western border.

Dusty Miller

Dusty Miller

A privacy hedge was installed in February 2011 along the southern border. The ‘Blue Point’ Junipers have remained healthy and are noticeably taller this year. Suddenly branches are growing in weird directions so I must figure out how to prune them better. It will still be a while before these trees fill out the edge of the southern border, but already they help provide a sense of enclosure when standing inside the garden.

'Blue Point' Juniper

‘Blue Point’ Juniper

'Blue Point' Juniper

Looking from behind down the row of ‘Blue Point’ Junipers in the Southern Border

The hydrangea planted this year is growing well, although I had imagined it would be larger by now. The foliage is supposed to have nice red color in the fall.

Hydrangea quercifolia 'Ruby Slippers'  (Lil' Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)

Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’ (Lil’ Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)

Hydrangea quercifolia 'Ruby Slippers'  (Lil' Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)

Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’ (Lil’ Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)

Hydrangea quercifolia 'Ruby Slippers'  (Lil' Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)-3

Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’ (Lil’ Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)

Having finished blooming, now Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (Beardtongue) and Clematis ‘Jackmanii’ add garden interest with their seedpods.

Penstemon digitalis 'Husker Red' (Beardtongue)

Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (Beardtongue)

Clematis 'Jackmanii' and Rudbeckia hirta 'Irish Eyes'

Clematis ‘Jackmanii’ and Rudbeckia hirta ‘Irish Eyes’

Helianthus angustifolius (Swamp Sunflower) is a native plant I picked up through a friend’s plant exchange. I have found this plant to be rather aggressive. Growing to 5-feet, its dark-green leathery leaves are interesting and later in summer and fall the border will shine with its bright yellow daisy-like flowers.

Helianthus angustifolius (Swamp Sunflower)

Helianthus angustifolius (Swamp Sunflower)

A storm last week felled several trees and blew numerous branches and leaves around the neighborhood. Yesterday in the western border I encountered these browned leaves from a neighbor’s Platanus occidentalis (American sycamore). They serve as a reminder Summer has just started but it will pass quickly. Take time to enjoy every minute.

Platanus occidentalis (American sycamore)

Platanus occidentalis (American sycamore)

Platanus occidentalis (American sycamore)

Platanus occidentalis (American sycamore)

Thanks to Christina for hosting. Be sure to visit her to see her featured foliage and find links to other foliage highlights of other GBFD bloggers.

15 thoughts on “Garden Bloggers Foliage Day – June 2013

  1. Christina

    thanks for joining in GBFD again this month Susie. Dusty Miller looks like a rather attractive Artemisia, is that right? Pruning junipers can be tricky, have you cut the top ‘leads’ to encourage them to fill out? That might help the ones growing at strange angles too. Christina

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Christina, thanks for the tips. You must be right about the Dusty Miller. The person who gave it to me always called it that and even though I’ve confused them when trying to label photos, it didn’t dawn on me they were the same as Artemisia. This one is very delicate and fine-textured.

      I will try cutting the top leads–possibly I did it when they were younger. Pruning is something I need to learn more about.

      Reply
  2. Pauline

    Your artemesia is forming a nice edging to your western border, I tried growing it but our soil is too wet and heavy for it, it put on so much growth then flopped everywhere!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      We have lots of heavy, clay soil in Piedmont region of North Carolina so I know the frustration of that soil. This is actually growing over a French drain so it seems happy for now. It will flop eventually too so my edging is not a good long-term solution.

      Reply
  3. Marian St.Clair

    Those brown sycamore leaves don’t scare me. I know this sounds crazy, but summer is my least favorite season. I love a long spring and fall and the wide-open sky of winter, but summer’s heat and humidity wear me out. Your garden is lush and lovely though. Enjoy!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Yes, the heat and humidity are draining. I think it’s the long period of daylight and leisurely suppers I enjoy more than the garden during the summer. Have a good day Marian!

      Reply
  4. islandthreads

    Susie I like Dusty Miller in your first photo so did a search as artimisia does quite well where I am it copes with the winds and bonus I see a common name is beach wormwood so it copes with salt laden winds, I will be looking out for some, thanks for showing,
    I like your blue point junipers they make a beautiful backdrop for your other plants, those seedheads are lovely, Frances

    Reply
  5. islandthreads

    Susie I like Dusty Miller in your first photo so did a search as artimisia does quite well where I am it copes with the winds and bonus I see a common name is beach wormwood so it copes with salt laden winds, I will be looking out for some, thanks for showing,

    I like your blue point junipers they make a beautiful backdrop for your other plants, those seedheads are lovely, Frances

    Reply

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