Studying The Borders At May’s End—Northern Border

The Northern Border needs a lot of work. Now that the irises are finished this border is changing into a hodgepodge. Despite my efforts tradescantia is invading the iris beds and other aggressive plants have taken a strong-hold as well.  Roses and Peony ‘Pink Parfait’ was ruined by the heavy rains this year. Fortunately I cut four peony stems early to enjoy inside.

In front of the peony a large planting of Nepeta ‘Walker’s Low’ (Catmint) bloomed very well during May. Now though it is flopping over and I have already cut part of it back. Nearby, a pass-along plant, Phlox divaricata (Woodland phlox), was very late to open, but it made a strong show eventually.

Old-fashioned Sweet William were planted in this border in early spring and they are blooming beautifully now.

Dianthus barbatus (Sweet William)

Dianthus barbatus (Sweet William)

Dianthus barbatus (Sweet William)

Dianthus barbatus (Sweet William)

Dianthus barbatus (Sweet William)

Dianthus barbatus (Sweet William)

Dianthus barbatus (Sweet William)

Dianthus barbatus (Sweet William)

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower) is beginning to bloom in this northern border and throughout the garden.

Echinacea purpea (Purple coneflower)

Echinacea purpea (Purple coneflower)

This border is where I need to focus immediate attention.

8 thoughts on “Studying The Borders At May’s End—Northern Border

  1. Cathy

    All your borders are looking good – seems the weather has suited most plants, if not the gardener! Lovely to see cone flowers already – I’m not sure mine will flower this year as the snails have had a feast in this damp weather!

    Reply
  2. P&B

    Love your Sweet William. This is the plant I miss. I used to grow them in a row but slugs kept eating them. How do you manage to keep them healthy?

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks. This is one plant I have to keep adding back to my garden. As soon as the summer gets hot and dry they give up. Mail-ordered these this winter but if I would remember to plants seeds in the fall that would be best.

      Reply
  3. Christina

    Dianthus barbatus (Sweet William) reminds me of my childhood, my father always grew them. Do they self seed in your garden or do you sow every year; I am lazy where biennials are concerned, it just seems too much work and time for a short flowering. Christina

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Did you get your knowledge and love of gardening from your father, Christina? The Sweet William used to self-seed more reliably in my previous garden. Here I have to reseed and actually, I mail-ordered these as plants because I forgot to sow the seeds in the autumn. My gardening mentor, my mother’s older cousin, used to give me plants, including Sweet William, so I always associate them with her. Susie

      Reply

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