Garden Bloggers Foliage Day – May 2013

I am joining Christina at Creating my own garden of the Hesperides for Garden Bloggers Foliage Day (GBFD) and a chance to examine the importance of foliage in the garden.

This month I have enjoyed the prolific blooms of a spring garden and earlier today I posted a long entry about May flowers, but because of GBFD, I also kept an eye open for foliage highlights.

The plants I notice again and again are the silvery-leaved Stachys byzantina (Lamb’s Ear), perennial Dusty Miller and Artemisia, as they help break up the spaces and add interest—some pop—to the borders.

Stachys byzantina (Lamb's Ear) with Iris and Achillea

Stachys byzantina (Lamb’s Ear) with Iris and Achillea

Dusty Miller

Dusty Miller

Artemisia 'Powis Castle' (Wormwood)

Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ (Wormwood)

Dark colors especially the reds of Canna and Husker’s Red Penstemon worked to add excitement and even some sophistication to the garden.

Canna and Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Canna and Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Canna

Canna

Penstemons and Thyme In The Meditation Circle

Penstemons and Thyme In The Meditation Circle

Another plant with good foliage coloring is Heuchera (Coral Bells). It is available in many colors though the nurseries do not seem to stock many different ones.  I bought three Heuchera villosa ‘Big Top Bronze’ last year and finally got them planted in a permanent spot in April.

Heuchera villosa 'Big Top Bronze' (Coral Bells)

Heuchera villosa ‘Big Top Bronze’ (Coral Bells)

I have not cooked with this Golden Sage, but the bright yellow green coloration and pattern spilling out through the railing is reason enough to grow it.

Salvia Dorada 'Aurea' (Golden Sage)

Salvia Dorada ‘Aurea’ (Golden Sage)

Much of the foliage I have been following this month is intriguing simply as it is part of the amazing early stage of a plant’s growth cycle.  Flowers will eventually arrive, but for a long time before the plants bloom the volume created by the leaves and stems lifts the garden upward accenting it with shape and texture.

Liatris spicata 'Floristan Weiss' (Gayfeather)

Liatris spicata ‘Floristan Weiss’ (Gayfeather)

Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm)

Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm)

Leucanthemum x superbum (Shasta Daisy)

Leucanthemum x superbum (Shasta Daisy)

Phlox paniculata (Garden Phlox)

Phlox paniculata (Garden Phlox)

Anemone coronaria de Caen 'The Bride' and 'Mr. Fokker'

Anemone coronaria de Caen ‘The Bride’ and ‘Mr. Fokker’

Be sure to visit Christina to see her skillful use of foliage and find links to other GBFD bloggers.

14 thoughts on “Garden Bloggers Foliage Day – May 2013

  1. Pauline

    You have proved how hugely important foliage is to the garden, we have it for so much longer than some of the flowers which can be quite fleeting. When they contrast like your Cannas and Echinacea do, in colour, shape and texture they really make the garden zing!

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Pauline, there is so much for me to learn about how to assemble these elements for good effect. GBFD is a good reminder for me to pay attention to these things. susie

      Reply
  2. fredgonsowskigardenhome

    Hi there pbmgarden,

    A truly great garden is really a leaf tapestry made up of the colors green, blue-green, gray, burgundy and chartreuse (golden leaves). Flowers come and go, but it is really all about the colors and shapes of leaves that provide long term interest. Yes, annuals have a long bloom time, put perennials are in flower for one or two weeks, and before and after their bloom time you really only have their foliage to look at.

    Does Russian Sage (Perovskia) grow in your area, that is another gray plant with long term visual interest.

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Yes Russian Sage (Perovskia) grows here. I have several and I like it but it flops over quite a bit. I have tried it in several places but will keep trying to work it out.Thanks.

      Reply
      1. fredgonsowskigardenhome

        I have found that if it is cut back close to the ground yearly, it does not grow that tall, so there is possibly less chance for it flopping. Would you ever insert a few bamboo sticks in the ground by the plant, and run some jute string around the plants to keep them up?

    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks Annette. That Canna has orange blooms that pick up the orange cones of the Echinacea so I enjoy that combination for foliage and flower. Susie

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s