Last Day of May

Canna and Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Early this morning Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower) and Canna waited in the shade as the sun slowly moved to warm these sun-loving perennials.

Echinacea purpurea is native to Eastern USA and bees find it attractive. Later American Goldfinches will enjoy its seeds.

Canna and Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

While it still can this bee should enjoy the Tradescantia (Spiderwort) that abounds in the garden. This week I am making some progress in cutting it back, but am finding it difficult work to remove it by the roots.

Tradescantia (Spiderwort)

Although afternoon temperatures reached 92 degrees, the garden this morning was pleasant and mostly shaded, perfect for welcoming visitors to view the flowers. So when a neighbor and her friend walked by while I was taking pictures in the front side garden, I eagerly asked them to come to the back to see my garden.

This year, more than in any other year, I have felt comfortable with the state of the garden overall and am happy when I can share this place. It is not perfect, of course, but some key garden renovation projects during the last year have made the garden much more cohesive and have given it personality. The meditation circle is one such project and today my neighbor’s friend walked the meditation path, experiencing  a labyrinth for her first time. It was a nice morning in the garden.

6 thoughts on “Last Day of May

  1. Christina

    It is always so great to hear a gardener say that they are happy with their gardens; sometimes we are soo self crtical we forget how lovely what we’ve created is. I too love to share my garden with visitors; walking around with someone who hasn’t seen the garden before also opens my eyes to things I hadn’t noticed. Christina

    Reply
    1. pbmgarden Post author

      Thanks for your insightful comments Christina. It was a revelation of sorts yesterday when I realized I have reached a certain level of satisfaction with my garden that releases me to enjoy it, even as I understand it is always evolving and never complete.

      I think visitors to your garden are lucky indeed.

      Reply
  2. P&B

    You know that a true gardener never says that his or her garden is completed. “Satisfied, happy,” seem to be words gardeners use to describe their gardens, until next year.

    Reply

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