In A Vase On Monday – Anemones In Blue Vase

In A Vase On Monday – Anemones In Blue Vase

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share an arrangement using materials collected from our gardens.

Seeing anemones in my spring garden is a treat. These is a high attrition rate, few of those planted in the past few years ever made it to bloom. One particular batch overcame the odds though and even managed to return for several years, but now only three plants remain. Happily the ones left are prolific in their blooms.  Cutting seems to encourage more flowers, so I am happy to oblige.

The arrangement began with a favorite matte-finished, blue-gray jar. I primed the container with clumps of green leaves gathered from an abundant bed of Leucanthemum. This shasta daisy foliage provided a framework to hold the flowering stems of anemone without using mechanics.

In A Vase On Monday – Anemones In Blue Vase

Accents of Erysimum, Salvia ‘May Night’ and Iberis were tucked in and around for color, texture and contrast.

In A Vase On Monday – Anemones In Blue Vase

Erysimum ‘Sugar Rush Purple’ (Wallflower)

Some weeks the vases take a lot of thought and time, but this one floated together in a few short minutes, unwanting of adjustment or second-guessing.

In A Vase On Monday – Anemones In Blue Vase

Materials
Flowers
Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’
Erysimum ‘Sugar Rush Purple’ (Wallflower)
Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)
Salvia nemorosa ‘May Night’ (Hardy Sage)
Foliage
Leucanthemum x superbum (Shasta Daisy)
Vase
Handmade ceramic lidded jar

In A Vase On Monday – Anemones In Blue Vase

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower designs across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place In A Vase On Monday.

Upcoming 2018 Chapel Hill Garden Tour

UNC President’s Garden, Franklin Street, Chapel Hill, NC

When you have worked and worked in your own garden until every inch is perfect, or if it is not yet perfect, but you just need a break from planting and weeding, or you are in need of some inspiration, or if you just love and appreciate exploring well-turned gardens, or if you are looking for something fun to do the weekend of April 28 and April 29, 2018, get tickets now for the Chapel Hill Garden Tour.

Every two years the Chapel Hill Garden Club sponsors this charitable and educational event. Tour proceeds support the interactive Children’s Wonder Garden and programs at the North Carolina Botanical Garden, as well as community outreach programs of the Chapel Hill Garden Club.

This year’s theme is Town & Gown Gardens ~ Synergy in Bloom. Highlighting the cooperative relationship between the University of North Carolina and the local Chapel Hill community, the Tour will feature the UNC President’s Garden, current and former UNC officials’ private gardens, four distinctive local gardens, UNC’s Coker Arboretum, and the NC Botanical Garden.

Plein air artists, musicians, select educators and vendors will add additional charm to several gardens. A Tour photography contest with prizes and an exhibition is open to all who attend the tour.

On Saturday of the tour in what has become a tradition, I will be touring the gardens with three former work colleagues and longtime friends. We enjoy walking and talking, taking our time and drinking in the flavor and character of each property.

Currier – Unique collection of Maples and Conifers accompanied by fascinating perennials and shrubs.

Then Sunday morning I will be stationed as a guide in the Currier Garden. It was once home to The Unique Plant, a recently closed retail garden store. Over 26 years, the owner Joann Currier created a sprawling, 3.5-acre private botanical garden legendary for its unique vegetation, pristine maintenance, and spectacular use of texture, layer, form, and rhythm in garden design.

Currier told the tour committee, “Some people collect shoes. I collect Japanese maples.”

Currier Garden

Visitors to this garden can see 130 species of maples and a host of rare conifers, mixed borders and a recently added rock garden that sports unusual, colorful cacti hardy enough to brave North Carolina’s winters. Did I mention the parterre pocket garden or the greenhouse area, filled with rare plants?

Currier Garden

I am looking forward to exploring all the gardens on the tour. If you are local (or even if you’re not), come take advantage of the opportunity to see these special gardens. Descriptions and photos of the other tour gardens and ticket information are at Chapel Hill Garden Tour. Hope to see you there.

Photographs courtesy Daphne McLeod and Kathy Swendiman.

In A Vase On Monday – Delicate Quietude

In A Vase On Monday – Delicate Quietude

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share an arrangement using materials collected from our gardens.

In A Vase On Monday – Delicate Quietude

A second group of irises abruptly opened all at once on Saturday. My first thought was to showcase them in a lush bouquet, but as springtime settles in there is competition for what enters the Monday vase. So this week only one stalk of iris stands sentry. This is Iris germanica ‘Raspberry Blush’ (and friends).

In A Vase On Monday – Delicate Quietude

A late-blooming narcissus and Solomon’s seal were two surprises I had not remembered to expect.  Finding them changed the direction today’s vase took. The pair proved challenging to combine but I like the echo of yellow between the trumpet of one and the broad leaves of the other.

Narcissus and Polygonatum biflorum (Solomon’s seal)

The Solomon’s seal is a 2-year old passalong from my friend Chris.

Narcissus and Polygonatum biflorum (Solomon’s seal)

I stair-stepped the narcissus faces in parallel with the dangling flowers of Solomon’s seal; eventually the effect was lost to the greater cause of trying to balance the overall design.

In the end the physical limitation of the floral pin in the vase dictated the final look.  There just was room to add a slender stem of Phlox stolonifera ‘Sherwood Purple.’

In A Vase On Monday – Delicate Quietude

Materials
Flowers
Iberis sempervirens (Candytuft)
Iris germanica ‘Raspberry Blush’
Narcissus
Phlox stolonifera ‘Sherwood Purple’
Polygonatum biflorum (Solomon’s seal)
Foliage
Leucanthemum x superbum (Shasta Daisy)
Vase
Porcelain Ikebana vase, Georgetown Pottery, Maine. Rectangle Blue Zen (6.75L x 3.75W x 2H inches)

In A Vase On Monday – Delicate Quietude

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower designs across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday – Iris And Raindrops

In A Vase On Monday – Iris And Raindrops

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share an arrangement using materials collected from our gardens.

If I had to choose one flower I most enjoy in the garden it would be iris. So when I returned home Friday from a memorable 3-day beach yoga retreat, it was thrilling to discover the first of this year’s irises are in bloom. After waiting most of our wet, soggy Saturday for a break in the weather which never came, I finally ventured into the rain to admire the flowers up close.

Iris germanica ‘Orinoco Flow’

Pattern, detail, line, color, contrast—Iris germanica ‘Orinoco Flow’ has a lot to appreciate. There is a slight fragrance as well. This iris was a lucky trade in a neighborhood plant exchange a few years ago.

Edges of the falls resemble embroidery stitching.

I decided to rescue a handful of the irises and put them to good use as my Monday vase offering.

In A Vase On Monday – Iris And Raindrops

For good measure I included several sprigs of May Night salvia which had also opened while I was away.

Salvia nemorosa ‘May Night’ (Hardy Sage)

Using a 2-inch pin holder to hold the stems in place, the design went together quickly. With raindrops still clinging, the flowers were placed on a round shiny black dish among scattered black stones.

In A Vase On Monday – Iris And Raindrops

Materials
Flowers
Iris germanica ‘Orinoco Flow’
Salvia nemorosa ‘May Night’ (Hardy Sage)
Foliage
Iris leaf
Vase
2-inch round holder with integrated floral pin
Oasis Lomey 11″ Designer Dish, black, round
Black stones

Iris germanica ‘Orinoco Flow’

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower designs across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place In A Vase On Monday.

In A Vase On Monday – Easter White

In A Vase On Monday – Easter White

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share an arrangement using materials collected from our gardens.

Several stems of Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’ join nearly 3 dozen Narcissus ‘Thalia’ for a simple presentation prepared for Easter weekend. The Thalia were meant to be today’s star, but once I tucked the purplish blue flowers at the neck of the jar, the character of the arrangement shifted.

In A Vase On Monday – Easter White

Just a hint of Phlox subulata ‘Emerald Cushion Blue’ softens the vase’s edge, uniting container and flowers.

In A Vase On Monday – Easter White

 

Materials
Flowers
Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’
Narcissus ‘Thalia’ (Thalia Daffodil)
Phlox subulata ‘Emerald Cushion Blue’
Foliage
None
Vase
Handmade ceramic lidded jar

 

Three stages of Anemone coronaria ‘Mr. Fokker’. Lower left one is from last week’s vase.

I like the simplicity of this combination.

In A Vase On Monday – Easter White

With another nod to Easter celebration, I pulled out my daughter’s childhood cup to hold leftover tufts of phlox along with the year’s first blooms of Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine).

Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower designs across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place In A Vase On Monday.