In A Vase On Monday – Dahlias In A Silver Bowl

In A Vase On Monday – Dahlias In A Silver Bowl

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of cuttings from our gardens.

In A Vase On Monday – Dahlias In A Silver Bowl

I planned to showcase zinnias today but after a heavy day of rain on Friday the dahlias needed trimming back and re-staking. I collected so many dahlias I never made it back around to the zinnias. I passed along some flowers to neighbors and then spent a few peaceful moments arranging.

In A Vase On Monday – Dahlias In A Silver Bowl

In A Vase On Monday – Dahlias In A Silver Bowl

Later I spent a few minutes chasing daylight, even resorting to artificial light in the dining room.

In A Vase On Monday – Dahlias In A Silver Bowl

In A Vase On Monday – Dahlias In A Silver Bowl

Finally I placed them by a sunny window in the living room where we can enjoy them all day. The sunlight exaggerates the color of the left-most white Dahlia ‘Tsuku Yori No Shisha’ to nearly lemon-yellow.

In A Vase On Monday – Dahlias In A Silver Bowl

In A Vase On Monday – Dahlias In A Silver Bowl

A wedding present not used often enough, the Paul Revere bowl measures 11 inches in diameter by 5-inches tall. The flower arrangement is approximately 21-inches wide by 14-inches high.

In A Vase On Monday – Dahlias In A Silver Bowl

Objectively speaking I think some careful editing would allow breathing room and would enhance the design, but overall I am happy to see this huge bowl of dahlias brightening the house.

In A Vase On Monday – Dahlias In A Silver Bowl

Materials
Flowers
Dahlia sp.
Dahlia ‘Cafe Au Lait’
Dahlia ‘David Howard’
Dahlia ‘Tsuku Yori No Shisha’
Foliage
Asiatic lily
Materials
Paul Revere bowl, large

In A Vase On Monday – Dahlias In A Silver Bowl

In A Vase On Monday – Dahlias In A Silver Bowl

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the world. Visit her to discover what surprises she and others found to place in a vase this week.

In A Vase On Monday – Glow With Pink and Creme

In A Vase On Monday – Glow With Pink and Creme

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of cuttings from our gardens.

In A Vase On Monday – Glow With Pink and Creme

In A Vase On Monday – Glow With Pink and Creme

Prepared a few days ago two jars of Dahlia ‘Cafe Au Lait’ brighten our home on a rainy Sunday afternoon as remnants of Hurricane Delta pass through North Carolina.

In A Vase On Monday – Glow With Pink and Creme

The dark blue jar is 6.75 inches tall, the botanic one is just under 6 inches.

In A Vase On Monday – Glow With Pink and Creme

In A Vase On Monday – Glow With Pink and Creme

The dahlias range from 4 to 6.5 inches in diameter, some with hints of yellow.

In A Vase On Monday – Glow With Pink and Creme

In A Vase On Monday – Glow With Pink and Creme

In A Vase On Monday – Glow With Pink and Creme

Materials
Flowers
Dahlia ‘Cafe Au Lait’
Foliage
None
Materials
Dark blue matte ceramic jar
Portmerion- Botanic vase made in England

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the world. Visit her to discover what surprises she and others found to place in a vase this week.

Wordless Wednesday – Yesterday

Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae)

Monarch (Danaus plexippus)

Common Buckeye (Junonia coenia)

Listen for liquid bird song at 16 seconds. Maybe Brown Cow Bird?

More of the liquid bird song.

Eastern Tailed-Blue (Cupido comyntas)

Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus)

Long-tailed Skipper (Urbanus proteus)

In A Vase On Monday – October Surprise

In A Vase On Monday – October Surprise

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of cuttings from our gardens.  Blooming since June, dahlias continue to light up the garden.

In A Vase On Monday – October Surprise

The apricot orange is D. ‘David Howard’, the white is D. ‘Tsuku Yori No Shisha’ and D. ‘Gallery Art Deco’ is the sunset red. After weeks of sharing these dahlias it is challenge to find a new way to present them, so I am staying with a tried and true traditional design.

In A Vase On Monday – October Surprise

In A Vase On Monday – October Surprise

A maroon chrysanthemum from last year’s purchase adds a touch more red richness.  Added at the last moment Adonis blue Butterfly Bush contributes a bit of surprise.

In A Vase On Monday – October Surprise

In A Vase On Monday – October Surprise

An autumn addition to this week’s vase is an aster that overtook an entire garden bed years ago.  I continue to try to eradicate it. I thought at least I could put it to good use this Monday, but I find I it hard to fix this bad relationship. I’ll continue to get rid of the aster. The garden does not need the chaos.

In A Vase On Monday – October Surprise

In A Vase On Monday – October Surprise

Materials
Flowers
Alyssum
Aster (Symphyotrichum)
Buddleja davidii ‘Adokeep’ (Adonis blue Butterfly Bush)
Chrysanthemum
Dahlia ‘David Howard’
Dahlia ‘Gallery Art Deco’
Dahlia ‘Tsuku Yori No Shisha’
Foliage
Gardenia sp.
Itea virginica ‘Sprich’ LITTLE HENRY (Virginia sweetspire)
Materials
Ceramic Urn Stamped “Vintage 4”
Lomey plastic dish insert, eco-friendly floral foam

In A Vase On Monday – October Surprise

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the world. Visit her to discover what surprises she and others found to place in a vase this week.

October’s Beginning

Iris germanica ‘Immortality’

Immortality is a reblooming iris that has been surprising me with fresh blooms.

Thursday I had a fun but frustrating few minutes chasing a Red-spotted Purple (Limenitis arthemis ssp. astyanax).

(iNaturalist originally suggested this was Red-spotted Admiral (Limenitis arthemis) but the identification has been updated by two reviewers. The only other time I’ve recorded one in my garden is August 29, 2015. It may also have been incorrectly identified. Will have to check on that.)

Much quicker than I, this one escaped several close-up portraits so I can only show drastically cropped images.

Red-spotted Purple (Limenitis arthemis ssp. astyanax) (earlier misidentified as Red-spotted Admiral)
Red-spotted Purple (Limenitis arthemis ssp. astyanax) (earlier misidentified as Red-spotted Admiral)

I rely heavily on iNaturalist for identifications but its artificial intelligence algorithms are imperfect. It suggested Polites peckius, the Peck’s skipper for the next, but in fact the insect is yet another of the much more common Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus). When after a few hours no iNaturalist reviewer had seconded that id I submitted the images to Carolina Leps (Butterflies and Moths), a Facebook forum with local and willing experts. So okay, plenty of fieries this year.

Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus)

For a week I have spotted a yellow butterfly sailing high across the garden and finally yesterday managed a quick shot of a Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae). Generally butterflies prefer flowers which are single in form, but the cloudless stopped at several of the frilly, fringed Dahlia ‘Tsuku Yori No Shisha’. Who could resist it!

Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae)

I have seen several clouded skippers this year and posted one earlier in the week. This one landed yesterday on a segment of verbena bonariensis that still has fresh flowers. Most have gone to seed. These images captured the markings and detail of Clouded Skipper (Lerema accius), so I am sharing them here for reference.

Clouded Skipper (Lerema accius)
Clouded Skipper (Lerema accius)
Clouded Skipper (Lerema accius)

Hope you had a chance to marvel at October’s harvest moon. Enjoy a fine weekend and thanks for reading.

Garden Delights

Viceroy (Limenitis archippus)

Another busy week is done that left little time for the garden. There were warm, humid days, stormy days, bright days with the bluest sky imaginable and on this sunny first of October morning the air has a refreshing chill (before warming to 78°F).

On the last few days of September, in brief segments measured merely in minutes, I wandered the garden to recharge, each time finding some small delight.

I have had a few monarchs visit each year but Tuesday marked the first time I have seen a viceroy. Viceroy (Limenitis archippus) is distinguished by the black line across the veins on its hind wings.

Viceroy (Limenitis archippus)

I spotted another yesterday (or perhaps the same one returned, but I think the black vein looks thinner).

Viceroy (Limenitis archippus)

Viceroy (Limenitis archippus)

My incarnations of  Dahlia ‘Cafe Au Lait’ have not always been true to the catalogs but one plant in particular sometimes throws up a pretty one.

Dahlia ‘Cafe Au Lait’

Dahlia ‘Cafe Au Lait’

There were several other butterflies of note, a Common Buckeye (Junonia coenia) and a Black Swallowtail (Papilio polyxenes). These are commonly sighted where I live but fairly infrequent in my garden.

Common Buckeye (Junonia coenia)

Common Buckeye (Junonia coenia)

Black Swallowtail (Papilio polyxenes)

Black Swallowtail (Papilio polyxenes)

A few dianthus plants are blooming more easily now the weather is cooler.  How is this for a colorful greeting?

Dianthus Ideal Select Mix

The small skippers were everywhere midsummer but numbers have declined significantly in the past 5-6 weeks.  iNaturalist is my goto source to identify skippers (mostly fieries, ocolas).  I found another clouded skipper this week.

Clouded Skipper (Lerema accius)

An interesting creature, if not the loveliest, this grasshopper tried to hide from the camera.

Differential Grasshopper (Melanoplus differentialis)

Differential Grasshopper (Melanoplus differentialis)

I will finish with a quick video of the black swallowtail, frenetically searching for sustenance among lantana flowers.

 

In A Vase On Monday – Ikebana Study

In A Vase On Monday – Ikebana Study

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of cuttings from our gardens.

Foliage was my starting point for this design. Ginger lily is blooming beautifully this year. It is sending up many new stalks, some of whose tips I harvested for today’s vase.

The dahlias are thriving in the cooler weather and seemed unfazed after quite heavy rain Friday. For this Ikebana-style arrangement I chose creamy white Dahlia ‘Tsuku Yori No Shisha’ paired with a purply pink one whose name I do not know. The latter was included as a bonus with this year’s spring order and I failed to record it.

Dahlia ‘Tsuku Yori No Shisha’

Dahlia sp.

Both flowers and foliage went in easily and I was satisfied with the placements until I began photographing. The flowers themselves were grand but the overall effect was underwhelming.

In A Vase On Monday – Ikebana Study

I kept coming back to them during the next hour and finally began experimenting with adding to the vase.  Eventually I was happy again with the design. The color of the deep pink zinnia adds surprise. The zinnia stem arches gently away toward the back left.  An added piece of ginger lily foliage continues the curving line down through the right corner, where a few sprigs of gardenia leaves help anchor everything.

In A Vase On Monday – Ikebana Study

With the movement created by the changes I think the design is more graceful.

In A Vase On Monday – Ikebana Study

Materials
Flowers
Dahlia sp.
Dahlia ‘Tsuku Yori No Shisha’
Zinnia
Foliage
Gardenia sp.
Hedychium coronarium (Ginger lily)
Vase
Porcelain Ikebana vase, Georgetown Pottery, Maine. Rectangle Blue Zen (6.75L x 3.75W x 2H inches)

Zinnia

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place in a vase this week.

Finding Nourishment

Dahlia ‘Gallery Art Deco’

It is Friday, 62 degrees Fahrenheit at midday, with showers and a bit of fog after a morning of heavy rain. During one brief lull I stepped outdoors into drizzle and onto squishy earth for a few much-needed minutes of garden nourishment.

Shasta season has long been over but fresh blooms appear sporadically.

Leucanthemum x superbum (Shasta Daisy)

My mother’s cousin Virgie’s everlasting sweet pea, originally passed along to me decades ago, has had its best year ever in the 19 years growing in this garden.

Lathyrus latifolius (Perennial Sweet Pea)

This red salvia is not particularly showy but hummingbirds stop over on most days.

Salvia greggii ‘Furman’s Red’ (Autumn Sage)

Dahlias seem to be trying to make up for lost time.

Dahlias

Dahlia ‘Gallery Art Deco’

Dahlia ‘Gallery Art Deco’

Dahlia

Dahlia

Zinnias, usually the mainstay of my summer garden, remind me I have to find a way to rabbit-proof the borders, a daunting task.

Zinnia

This week P. at Petals and Wings (blog and Instagram) generously shared lavender irises with me. I am so excited to see them flower and experience their fragrance next spring, but first the ground needs to dry so I can get them planted. Meanwhile a white reblooming iris is getting battered by rain today.

Iris germanica ‘Immortality’

Bees enjoy spiderwort but I have to work to keep it from taking over the garden.

Tradescantia (Spiderwort)

I planted this itea four years ago. Its presence has been decidedly understated until now.

Itea virginica ‘Sprich’ LITTLE HENRY (Virginia sweetspire)

A native purchased at the North Carolina Botanical Garden in 2012 this rudbeckia produces small, misshapen flowers, yet it shouts happy to be here.

Rudbeckia fulgida (Orange Coneflower)

This salvia is one of my favorites. It has largely run rampant in one section of the garden, but is easy to remove.  That’s the best kind of plant to have I think.

Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’

Silvery foliage of Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ has been attractive for months. Behind it Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’ adds a colorful layer.

Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ (Wormwood), Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’ (Lil’ Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)

Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ (Wormwood), Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’ (Lil’ Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)

Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’ (Lil’ Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)

The jewel-like hue of Butterfly Bush is even more dramatic in the rain.

Buddleja davidii ‘Adokeep’ (Adonis blue Butterfly Bush)

Buddleja davidii ‘Adokeep’ (Adonis blue Butterfly Bush)

Columbine makes a nice ground cover throughout portions of the garden.

Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)

Exceptionally colorful this year the dogwood is forming a nice crop of berries.

Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood)

Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood)

For now the garden still offers plenty of color. Hope you are finding nourishment in your own way today.

September Portrait

This week on Instagram I joined Amy @newgatenarcissi for another #gardenmonthlycollage for September 2020.

Row 1: Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus), Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower), Row 2: Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus), Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood), Dahlia (unknown), Lycoris radiata (Spider Lily) and Spiderwort Row 3: Monarda didyma (Scarlet Beebalm), Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor) (technically August 31), Dahlia ‘Cafe Au Lait’, Dahlia ‘Tsuku Yori No Shisha’ Row 4: Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’ (Lil’ Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea), Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus), Iris and H. quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’, Lycoris radiata (Spider Lily)

It is fun to create these collages but because of space limitations they are not entirely representative of the month.  With the changing leaf color on the hydrangea and the dogwood, this one illustrates the autumnal slide toward cooler weather.

In A Vase On Monday – Last-Of-Summer Orb

In A Vase On Monday – Last Of Summer Orb

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of cuttings from our gardens.

In A Vase On Monday – Last Of Summer Orb

Tomorrow fall officially begins. Autumn equinox arrives on Tuesday, September 22, 2020, at 9:31 A.M. EDT.

Today, on the last day of summer, this spherical floral design features zinnias and dahlias circling round a supportive framework of gardenia stems and a sheaf of oakleaf hydrangea leaves.

In A Vase On Monday – Last Of Summer Orb

Although summer is ending, I expect dahlias and zinnias to serve as the mainstay of color in the garden first frost.

In A Vase On Monday – Last Of Summer Orb

In A Vase On Monday – Last Of Summer Orb

In A Vase On Monday – Last Of Summer Orb

In A Vase On Monday – Last Of Summer Orb

Materials
Flowers
Dahlia ‘Gallery Art Deco’
Buddleja davidii ‘Adokeep’ (Adonis blue Butterfly Bush)
Dahlia ‘Cafe Au Lait’
Dahlia ‘David Howard’
Dahlia ‘Tsuku Yori No Shisha’
Gardenia jasminoides ‘August Beauty’
Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower), Seed heads
Verbena bonariensis (Tall Verbena)
Zinnia
Foliage
Gardenia jasminoides ‘August Beauty’
Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’ (Lil’ Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)
Vase
Melon Bowl, Vendanges (Blue Trim) by Ceralene, A. Raynaud et Cie, Limoges, France

One more vase today

This is a different arrangement I prepared especially for my husband who is recuperating after an illness. Increasingly he has admired my In A Vase On Monday posts and over the past months he has commented many times how nice it is to have flowers in our house all the time. While the materials used are nearly identical in both arrangements, I actually prefer this one. The proportions and scale feel more balanced, the flowers are looser and more energetically placed, the supporting gardenia foliage buoys and lifts the design. As these are imbued with healing and love I hope these flowers serve to cheer and uplift everyone today.

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place in a vase this week.

In A Vase On Monday – Dahlias In Blue Vase

In A Vase On Monday – Dahlias In Blue Vase

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of cuttings from our gardens.

I gathered as many flowers as I could Friday during a brief foraging opportunity and left them to condition overnight.

This Week’s Garden Bounty

Dahlias color the garden this month, and especially striking right now are the dinnerplate varieties.  I find these large flowers compelling but I long for more interesting and compatible outline and filler materials to set them off.  Russian Sage and Verbena bonariensis are not vase-happy for long but they’re what I had on hand.

In A Vase On Monday – Dahlias In Blue Vase

Stems of Baptisia foliage are energetic and lively but I overdid their use initially and ended up removing quite a lot.

In A Vase On Monday – Dahlias In Blue Vase

My late crop of Zinnias needed dead-heading and so were not at their best. I added just a few for a splash of surprise and texture variation, along with one faded D. ‘Gallery Art Deco’.

In A Vase On Monday – Dahlias In Blue Vase

Materials
Flowers
Dahlia ‘Gallery Art Deco’
Dahlia ‘Cafe Au Lait’
Dahlia sp.
Salvia yangii (Russian Sage) , previously known as Perovskia atriplicifolia
Verbena bonariensis (Tall Verbena)
Zinnia
Foliage
Baptisia ‘Purple Smoke’
Vase
Dark blue matte ceramic jar

In A Vase On Monday – Dahlias In Blue Vase

In A Vase On Monday – Dahlias In Blue Vase

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place in a vase this week.

In A Vase On Monday – Pinks

In A Vase On Monday – Pinks

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of cuttings from our gardens.

I had gathered all the dahlias the garden offered up on Sunday but didn’t have time to arrange them. I left them for our flower-loving neighbor to find. During a lull in activities I took a few quick shots of a clutch of dianthus I’d cut as an afterthought. For a bit of cheer and with a nod to host Cathy’s love of props, I staged the flowers with a miniature sugar bowl from our daughter’s childhood tea set.

In A Vase On Monday – Pinks

Materials
Flowers and Foliage
Dianthus Ideal Select Mix
Vase
Small white, elliptical ceramic vase

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place in a vase this week.

Early September Scenes

It has been a hot, dry week. The garden is turning toward autumn.

Dahlia ‘Gallery Art Deco’

Dahlia ‘Gallery Art Deco’

Dahlia

Dahlia

Zinnia

Dahlia ‘Tsuku Yori No Shisha’ and D. ‘David Howard’

Common Buckeye (Junonia coenia)

Common Buckeye (Junonia coenia) (Waterlogue filter)

Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus)

Carolina Mantis (Stagmomantis carolina) on Hedychium coronarium (Ginger lily)

Butterfly Sightings Today

Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor)

Today was an interesting time for seeing a variety of butterflies in my garden.  Checking twice for a few minutes each time yielded some firsts for me, novice that I am. Nothing I saw is rare or unexpected for this county at this time of year, but it was exciting nonetheless to see so many different things here in one day.

11:17-11:25 am
Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor) First of year (saw one last year August 15, 2019)
Long-tailed Skipper (Urbanus proteus) First life sighting
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio glaucus)

12:33-12:48 pm
Silver-spotted Skipper (Epargyreus clarus)
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio glaucus) 3 yellow and 3 dark morphs (6 total).
Monarch (Danaus plexippus)
Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor) (same individual as earlier judging by the missing tail)
American Snout (Libytheana carinenta) First life sighting
Common Buckeye (Junonia coenia) (spotted one earlier session but couldn’t get photo)
Cabbage White (Pieris rapae)

[Addendum: Later in the afternoon around 3:30 pm I saw a Black Swallowtail on zinnias in front yard, but had no camera handy.]

I spent most of the first session watching this beautiful creature with its gorgeous blue. It checked out verbena bonariensis briefly but once it found the lantana nearby it was content to stay put.

Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor)

Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor)

Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor)

Just as the swallowtail drifted to the back side out of view, this amazing skipper landed beside me.  The tail of the long-tailed skipper definitely stood out as did the blue coloration. I had about 5 seconds to enjoy it before it flew off.

Long-tailed Skipper (Urbanus proteus)

While eating lunch I had seen a white butterfly flash by so I stepped back into the garden with the camera for session 2, but of course it was not in sight. I checked out the butterfly bush where six Eastern Tiger Swallowtails were hanging out.

A Silver-spotted Skipper landed out of nowhere. I have seen several this week. A quick photo shoot sent it off elsewhere, so I went back to the E. T. Swallowtails.

Silver-spotted Skipper (Epargyreus clarus)

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio glaucus)

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio glaucus)

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio glaucus)

A Monarch landed on nearby Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower) and posed.

Monarch (Danaus plexippus)

Moving to the southern border where the lantana is I spotted (probably the same) Pipevine Swallowtail again.

Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor)

Across the garden I noticed action in the northern border. In the iris bed feeding on salvia is where I saw my first ever American Snout (Libytheana carinenta).  I was not sure what it was but “snout” came to mind!

American Snout (Libytheana carinenta)

Taking one more glance around I spotted a Common Buckeye. I had seen one earlier but could not get a photo.  Perhaps it was the same one, no way to know. Lovely and distinctive markings make it fun to see.

Common Buckeye (Junonia coenia)

The white butterfly reappeared. It was a Cabbage White.

Cabbage White (Pieris rapae)

Cabbage White (Pieris rapae)

 

In A Vase On Monday – Floral Harvest

In A Vase On Monday – Floral Harvest

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of cuttings from our gardens.

Today’s arrangement is an overflow of dahlias accented with a few zinnias. Staging the flowers atop a crystal pedestal vase suggests tradition and formality.

In A Vase On Monday – Floral Harvest

Dahlia ‘Cafe Au Lait’

Dahlia ‘Cafe Au Lait’

Dahlia ‘Cafe Au Lait’

Dahlia ‘David Howard’

Lycoris radiata (Spider Lily)

Zinnias and Dahlia ‘Tsuku Yori No Shisha’

Materials
Flowers
Dahlia ‘Cafe Au Lait’
Dahlia ‘David Howard’
Dahlia ‘Tsuku Yori No Shisha’
Lycoris radiata (Spider Lily)
Foliage
Gaura lindheimeri ‘Passionate Blush’ (Butterfly Gaura)
Vase
Crystal pedestal dish

Zinnia

In A Vase On Monday – Floral Harvest

Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place in a vase this week.

Yesterday’s Garden

Hedychium coronarium (Ginger lily)

As soon as I noticed the ginger lily in bloom yesterday I began photographing it until a soft breeze sent the lemony sweet fragrance my way. It was a reminder to pause and appreciate.

Hedychium coronarium (Ginger lily)

I gathered dahlias yesterday and finally decided it was time to cut some zinnias too, the latest zinnia harvest I’ve known.

Dahlias and Zinnias

Dahlias and Zinnias

There have been Eastern Tiger Swallowtails in the garden all week, enough that I finally didn’t feel the urge to take more pictures. The first Painted Lady butterfly I have seen this year appeared on lantana late afternoon.

Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui)

Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui)

The number of Fiery and Ocola skippers has declined dramatically over the past two weeks, but I don’t often see Zabulon Skippers, at least that I can identify, but this is one, a female. I encountered it accidentally, thinking it was a Silver-Spotted on I had been following.

Zabulon Skipper (Lon zabulon)

Silver-spotted Skipper (Epargyreus clarus)

Late August Garden

I have promised myself someday I will return to painting (but this month I did not).

Dahlia ‘David Howard’

Waterlogue. Vibrant

Dahlia ‘Cafe Au Lait’

Waterlogue. Vibrant

Lantana camara (Common lantana)

Waterlogue. Rainy

Southern Border

Waterlogue. Rainy

Tulbaghia (society garlic)

Waterlogue. Rainy

Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’

Waterlogue. Rainy

Zinnia

Waterlogue. Bold

Zinnia

Waterlogue. Rainy

Sleepy Orange (Abaeis nicippe)

Waterlogue. Bold

In A Vase On Monday – Dahlia Bowl

In A Vase On Monday – Dahlia Bowl

Each Monday Cathy at Rambling In The Garden invites us to share a vase of cuttings from our gardens.

Dahlias have seemed cheered by a few rains and some slightly cooler days the past couple weeks.

Dahlia ‘Tsuku Yori No Shisha’

I cut all available flowers to encourage them to keep up the good work.  These are arranged into a low flat bowl with a hint of columbine foliage.

In A Vase On Monday – Dahlia Bowl

Although I have cut the plants back several times the stems are still quite short.

In A Vase On Monday – Dahlia Bowl

In A Vase On Monday – Dahlia Bowl

In A Vase On Monday – Dahlia Bowl (no ID for this dahlia)

Materials
Flowers
Dahlia sp. (no ID on the magenta)
Dahlia ‘Cafe Au Lait’
Dahlia ‘David Howard’
Dahlia ‘Gallery Art Deco’
Dahlia ‘Tsuku Yori No Shisha’
Foliage
Aquilegia canadensis (Eastern red columbine)
Vase
Black Matte Dish With Red Interior

Stay safe from impending hurricanes and propaganda this week.  Thanks to Cathy at Rambling In The Garden for hosting and giving us an opportunity to share flower-filled vases across the world. Visit her to discover what she and others found to place in a vase this week.

An August Sunday Album

My grandmother’s mossy front yard held a magical surprise and each summer I was delighted by the appearance of her spider lilies. Finally in 2015 I added some to my own garden and today was the magical day they burst forth into bloom.

Lycoris radiata (Spider Lily)

Lycoris radiata (Spider Lily)

Lycoris radiata (Spider Lily)

Usually there are plentiful zinnias to use indoors butI have left them outside for now, the few zinnias from a second sowing. Finally they are in bloom, six or seven weeks later than normal due to the rabbit “crisis”.

Zinnia

Zinnia

Zinnia

Zinnia

Nearby, asclepias has rebloomed.

Asclepias tuberosa (Butterfly Plant)

There are other small pleasures.

Rudbeckia laciniata (Green-Headed Coneflower)

Verbena bonariensis (Tall Verbena)

Verbena bonariensis (Tall Verbena)

Dahlia ‘Cafe Au Lait’

Unknown dahlia

Phlox paniculata ‘Robert Poore’ (Garden phlox)

Lathyrus latifolius (Everlasting sweet pea)

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Salvia uliginosa ‘Blue Sky’ (Bog sage)

Lantana will continue well into October. On any given day it is a popular gathering place for butterflies and skippers. Today there were six Eastern Tiger Swallowtails, yesterday swallowtails and a couple of monarchs.

Lantana camara (Common lantana)

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio glaucus)

Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus)

The oakleaf hydrangea leaves point toward autumn, as do changes in light and pulsating sounds of cicadas, but mostly there is just a knowing deep inside, an inner sense that fall is near.  Every time I stepped outside this past week I felt it.

Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Ruby Slippers’ (Lil’ Ruby dwarf Oakleaf Hydrangea)

Garden Observations

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio glaucus)

It has been too hot for me to want to garden but occasionally I step outside with the camera to survey the visitors.

Early this morning I spotted a skipper flying erratically among Verbena bonariensis flowers along the front drive.

Ocola Skipper (Panoquina ocola)

Ocola Skipper (Panoquina ocola)

In the main garden in the back yard a large bush of common lantana draws many insects, as does the nearby Blue Sky salvia, both growing in the southern border. In the western border along the back fence a butterfly bush offers enticement.

Unlike last week when they merely passed through, several eastern tiger swallowtails spent the day.

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio glaucus)

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio glaucus)

In addition to the swallowtail, this morning in quick succession I enjoyed seeing some favorites return.  There was a male monarch in good condition bouncing back and forth between the lantana and salvia.

Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus)

Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus)

Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus)

Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus)

While photographing the monarch a Common Buckeye appeared, first one this year for me.

Common Buckeye (Junonia coenia)

Common Buckeye (Junonia coenia)

Can you spot where it fled to escape my persistent camera?

Common Buckeye (Junonia coenia)

I left the common buckeye alone once the first Hummingbird Clearwing of the season suddenly came into view. It has an easily recognizable profile.

Hummingbird Clearwing (Hemaris thysbe)

Hummingbird Clearwing (Hemaris thysbe)

The Hummingbird Clearwing didn’t stay still but it stayed around long enough for me to take portraits.

Hummingbird Clearwing (Hemaris thysbe)

Hummingbird Clearwing (Hemaris thysbe)

Within just a few minutes I was cheered to see such interesting creatures. Hope the garden is feeding your soul this August.